An MLB Total Recall?

Total Recall?

8/17/12 in MLB   |   This_is_Rick   |   265 respect

Yesterdays news in the MLB, will be the news today and probably rank column-worthy for the rest of the season. P.E.D's, no-no's, no-hopes and one, big time-clock had several teams, analysts and fans questioning the answers that provided comfort on the drive to the ball park.

Now, certain key scenarios have taken a hit, proving the known is really unknown. A total recall.

1.) The N.L West - The dream lasted for 117 games. But, with Melky's positive test, and suspension, the Giants star was quickly cast into the book of cheating and shame - Authored by McGwire, Bonds and Palmeiro - where he will forever be looked at as one thing, a fraud. Unfortunately for the Giants, the team impact will be even more devastating. Especially, within the division.  

It wasn't any hidden secret, the Giants line-up was missing strength with Cabrera in it. Now, the pressure on Posey, Sandoval and fan-favorite Hunter Pence to produce down the stretch is crucial. Sans Cabrera's .346 average, the task may be difficult, and almost too much, for a team that has not been able to rely on a complete pitching rotation the entire season - Even the Bay Area would not bet the mortgage on Lincecum and Zito collecting W's with less than 3-runs of support-per-game. 

The controversy on Cabrera will hang around the locker room for the rest of the season, and it may be the buzzing-bee of distraction Giants brass do not want looming. But, that is the case. Yes, Cabrera came out, directly, and admitted his wrong-doing. Yes, the Giants fans, and of the game itself, will have to go back to the drawing board and find another player that is, "doing it clean," again. Are the Dodgers watching this unfold more closely than any trade-deadline acquisition made in Los Angeles? Absolutely. Matt Kemp may get a small suspension for his outburst in Pittsburgh, today, but the appeal process will keep him in the line-up when the two teams start a series this Monday. Sadly, with the Dodgers pitching clicking, that spells trouble for the Giants.

Even more sadly, many people have already forgiven Cabrera because he admitted cheating, when others did not. Either way, the Giants lose. 
August 11, 2012; San Francisco, CA, USA; San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey (28) celebrates with left fielder Melky Cabrera (53) after scoring the two run home run to bat in Cabrera against the Colorado Rockies during the third inning at AT&T Park. Mandatory Credit: Kelley L Cox-US PRESSWIRE

2.) The Deal - Much like the Phillies and Cliff Lee, the Mariners have been toying with the idea of trading away Felix Hernandez for a blockbuster package of young, MLB-ready players in order to rebuild for the future. Yesterdays "perfect game," and the previous Yankees shut-down, should quickly hinder any idea of the sort. Unless the deal would send an All-Star caliber leadoff thru clean-up, the Mariners should stay put with King Felix. The team needs experienced talent to build around Hernandez - who is a true ace - not inexperienced talent to build around nothing. Dealing him would not only take fans out of the seats, it would also make seats in the front office extremely hot!

3.) The Mets - The knuckle-ball is a difficult pitch to hit...if it knuckles. The balloon-sized image coming towards a professional hitter, when the knuckle ball doesn't dance, is a completely different story. The reliance on R.A Dickey and the resurgent Santana to bolster a staff and team has left the New York Mets in a gaping hole. A 9-22 record since the break has once again shot down the hopes of the Mets faithful, leaving them looking up in what is a weak division. Dickey has still proven he is the best on the staff, and the Cincinnati game was a simple act of the ball not dancing. It will happen. But, Terry Collins has announced he will go with a 6-man rotation the rest of the season, keeping Dickey every 5-games. The reasoning does not stem from having too much talent on the staff. It comes from having too little. Those that thought the Mets could make a run may want to rethink their judgment. Terry Collins just did. 
Aug 12, 2012; Flushing, NY,USA;  New York Mets manager Terry Collins (10) relieves relief pitcher Josh Edgin (66) during the ninth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Citi Field.  Mets won 6-5.  Mandatory Credit: Anthony Gruppuso-US PRESSWIRE

4.) The Clock - If people in the Washington D.C area have been late for meetings, dates and business lunches it's because they are watching the 'Strasburg Clock" and not their own. Stephen Strasburg is catching up to his innings-max, quickly. And, it is during the key time of the season. Many experts have questioned if the move will actually happen, and what impact it will have on the Nationals team. The front office has said the shut-off will go accordingly, no question. But, the ground breaking territory in saving a young stars arm aside, what about the playoff run and the World Series, most importantly? The pennant does not only grow indigenous in the Washington area. Other teams have the same aspirations as the Nationals, and they will look to get better, currently and for the future. Once the clock strikes zero, we all know what will happen in D.C. It's when things go into the negative we do not.
August 15, 2012; San Francisco, CA, USA; Washington Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg delivers a pitch during the first inning against the San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park. Mandatory Credit: Beck Diefenbach-US PRESSWIRE

Will there be a recall? Totally?

This_is_Rick
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8/20/12   |   jaysinw   |   4954 respect

This_is_Rick wrote:
People that never played a game of baseball above little league do sometimes assume PED's give a player super powers. The gift of quick hands, strong arm, and an eye-for-the-game has been argued to have no effect by writers, players, etc.. I knew a player in the minors that was 90-91, consistently. He did two cycles of steroids and was hitting 95, on average, after the fact. You can't tell me the guy doing it clean, with 90 on the gun, won't look at that as cheating. Especially, when he is replaced by the other guy.

Just wonder you friend who went from 90-91 then after two cycles he was throw consistently 95 what was he taken. I watch Andy Petite who admitted taking PEDs and his fast ball never went over 94 when he admitted taking them. The weird thing is that how fast he was throwing before he started taking PEDs.

Changing the way some grip a ball can get you 3 to 4 more MPH on your fastball, and to see a differnce using PEDs takes more then two cycles, to really see changes in your strenght.

8/18/12   |   ML31   |   3675 respect

This_is_Rick wrote:
People that never played a game of baseball above little league do sometimes assume PED's give a player super powers. The gift of quick hands, strong arm, and an eye-for-the-game has been argued to have no effect by writers, players, etc.. I knew a player in the minors that was 90-91, consistently. He did two cycles of steroids and was hitting 95, on average, after the fact. You can't tell me the guy doing it clean, with 90 on the gun, won't look at that as cheating. Especially, when he is replaced by the other guy.

The thing is, there has been no medical correlation between using those drugs and added speed to a fastball.  The evidence just isn't there as of this writing.  I personally find it very hard to believe that the person in your example added speed as a result of steroid use.  There had to be other factors that led to it.  Perhaps he work out regime was done with a renewed vigor since he started his steroid cycle.  Or because he started using he needed to be more health conscious or needed to become much more serious about his workouts.  And don't underestimate the power the placebo effect has. 

8/18/12   |   This_is_Rick   |   265 respect

ML31 wrote:
Only want to say that just because some hollier-than-thou writers equate using banned substances as cheating (it's not, but let's save that for another argument) one shouldn't assume that McGwire, Bonds, Palmerio, et. al. are looked upon that way.  Personally, I think players who know they trap baseballs but still try to fake it out so the umpires don't see it are cheating a billion times worse than any drug user does.  Yet for some reason that kind of cheating is OK...

I guess I just don't get it.

People that never played a game of baseball above little league do sometimes assume PED's give a player super powers. The gift of quick hands, strong arm, and an eye-for-the-game has been argued to have no effect by writers, players, etc.. I knew a player in the minors that was 90-91, consistently. He did two cycles of steroids and was hitting 95, on average, after the fact. You can't tell me the guy doing it clean, with 90 on the gun, won't look at that as cheating. Especially, when he is replaced by the other guy.

8/16/12   |   ML31   |   3675 respect

Only want to say that just because some hollier-than-thou writers equate using banned substances as cheating (it's not, but let's save that for another argument) one shouldn't assume that McGwire, Bonds, Palmerio, et. al. are looked upon that way.  Personally, I think players who know they trap baseballs but still try to fake it out so the umpires don't see it are cheating a billion times worse than any drug user does.  Yet for some reason that kind of cheating is OK...

I guess I just don't get it.