College Football 2014: Brady Hoke, Will Muschamp Listed in This Season's Hot Seat Rankings

This Year's Hot Seat Rankings Feature Some Household Names

7/7/14 in NCAAF   |   Tyler_Waddell   |   426 respect

The 2013 college football season was a fun and wild ride – for most. Eleven different coaches were handed the dreaded pink slip throughout the year for various reasons, from failure to perform to drug use allegations. Blog Photo - College Football 2014: Brady Hoke, Will Muschamp Listed in This Season's Hot Seat Rankings

Of those 11 coaches to be relieved of their duties, eight were on my hot seat rankings heading into last September, including Lane Kiffin and Mack Brown.

Now that we’ve reached July and the 2014 season is quickly approaching, I’ve decided to update the hot seat list. As you’ll notice, there are some significant changes, but a few familiar names have earned their way back.

Coaches at "Highest Risk" are one big loss away from losing their job. The next hot seat level is called "Heating Up”, which means that the coach needs to start winning now. Those who found themselves in the "Safe for Now" have to get things moving in the right direction – and fast.

HIGHEST RISK

1. Charlie Weis, Kansas (4-20 record with school)


Weis helped Kansas end its 27-game Big 12 Conference losing streak last season, but the Jayhawks were helpless in the rest of their conference matchups. Kansas looks to regress a bit in 2014, and it’s no secret that Weis isn’t a fan favorite. He could be gone before the season ends.

2. Mike London, Virginia (18-31)

Virginia’s 8-5 season in 2011 is a distant memory, but it shows that a bowl bid under London is possible. There’s more than enough talent on the roster to win games, but translating it into success has been elusive for London and Co. – this is a bowl-or-bust situation for he and the coaching staff.

3. Tim Beckman, Illinois (6-18)

I was a bit surprised to see Athletic Director Mike Thomas give Beckman a third year following just one Big Ten Conference win in his first two, but then again, I’m in favor of giving a coach at least three or four years to implement his type of players into his system. However, if there’s not significant improvement – especially on defense – Beckman won’t see a fourth year, and that’s a fact.

4. Norm Chow, Hawaii (4-20)

The Warriors have been outscored by an average of 21.2 points during their 20 losses under Chow, and didn’t win a game in 2013 until November 30.

5. Paul Rhoades, Iowa State (27-36)

I don’t like including Rhoades so high on this list because I actually think he’s a good coach and deserves respect, but unfortunately, Iowa State just hasn’t found any sort of consistency since he’s taken over. If the Cyclones struggle again, he’ll be gone – but I have no doubt he’ll be coaching elsewhere.

6. Will Muschamp, Florida (22-16)

Florida’s massive amount of injuries would have crippled just about any football program, which is why Muschamp was awarded another shot. But if he swings and misses again, the Gators will be looking to replace him in a hurry. Anything less than eight wins could send Muschamp on a one-way ticket out of Gainesville; and that’s a number that will be difficult to achieve.

7. Dana Holgersen, West Virginia (21-17)

Like TCU, the move to the Big 12 hasn’t been the easiest for West Virginia. Since leaving the Big East (now the AAC), WVU is 11-14 with a 6-12 conference record. If Holgersen can’t fix the offense and turn things around in 2014, the Mountaineers will find someone that can.

HEATING UP

8. Ron Turner, Florida International (1-11)


FIU is probably starting to realize its mistake in firing Mario Cristobal. If the Panthers don’t win a couple Conference USA games and at least vie for a bowl bid, upper management will be looking to fix its omission.

9. Paul Petrino, Idaho (1-11)

It’s not the fact that Idaho won just one game in Petrino’s first season – no, that’s not really a big deal for a program that is 4-32 since 2011 – but rather that the Vandals aren’t eligible for postseason play due to low APR scores. It’s not all Petrino’s fault since he’s only been there for one year, but it still doesn’t help.

10. Kevin Wilson, Indiana (10-26)

Yes, Indiana has taken a step forward every season under Wilson. But the defense has been atrocious, and it caused the Hoosiers to miss out on a bowl game in a year where, really, they should have been playing in late December. Indiana will have another chance to make a bowl run this fall – a stronger chance, at that – and if it screws up this time, I don’t see Wilson being retained.

11. Kyle Flood, Rutgers (15-11)

With the way things have been with the Rutgers athletics department over the last year, I would expect everyone’s jobs to be on the line. Things should be no different with Flood, who coached his way into the hot seat discussion with last year’s performance. If my early preseason projections come true, Rutgers will dismiss Flood and look for someone that has qualifications to lead the program in its new Big Ten home.

12. Doug Martin, New Mexico State (2-10)

Nothing against Martin; it’s just that New Mexico State hasn’t made a bowl appearance since 1960, so it’s only a matter of time.

13. Bo Pelini, Nebraska (58-24)

There was a lot of negative talk among the Husker Nation following the decision to retain Pelini after another disappointing season in 2013 – one that featured one of the worst Nebraska defensive units ever. Pelini hasn’t lost more than four games as a head coach, but his frustrating late-season losses against Minnesota and Iowa in 2013, an embarrassing 70-31 loss against Wisconsin in the 2012 Big Ten Championship Game, and his inability to reach a BCS bowl has put him in this spot.

14. Skip Holtz, Louisiana Tech (4-8)

I was never a huge fan of this hire in the first place. Louisiana Tech is used to winning, and in 2013, it didn’t win.

15. Randy Edsall, Maryland (13-24)

The ridiculous amount of injuries Maryland has suffered over the last two seasons is overwhelming and almost unfair to Edsall, who is on the verge of losing his job because of win-loss record. If the Terps can stay healthy, they should be competitive in the Big Ten – they certainly have the talent to do so – and Edsall will keep his job.

16. Darrell Hazell, Purdue (1-11)

Purdue was really, really bad in 2013. Purdue looks like it’ll be pretty bad in 2014.

17. Paul Johnson, Georgia Tech (47-32)

Johnson has produced two 10-win products in his 12 years as an FBS head coach (2004 Navy, 2009 Georgia Tech). The Yellow Jackets have averaged seven wins over the last four seasons, and have missed out on a lot of opportunities to seize what’s been a mediocre ACC Coastal Division as of late. With a lack of continuity on the returning roster, this could be the year Johnson is ousted from Atlanta.

18. Brady Hoke, Michigan (26-13)

Last season was supposed to be the year that Michigan finally broke out of its slump and got back to being its normal, powerhouse self. Instead, the Wolverines went 7-6, posted a losing conference record, and lost to Ohio State (again). Hoke has the arsenal to win 10 games in 2014, but whether he can finally put it together or not will determine his fate as a coach in Ann Arbor.

SAFE FOR NOW, BUT GETTNG WARM

19. Trent Miles, Georgia State (0-12)

20. Sonny Dykes, California (1-11)

21. Mike Riley, Oregon State (88-73)

22. Todd Monken, Southern Miss (1-11)

23. June Jones, SMU (36-41)

24. Kirk Ferentz, Iowa (108-79)

25. Troy Calhoun, Air Force (49-41)



Tyler Waddell is the College Football Blog Manager for FanIQ. Follow him on Twitter.
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