David Ortiz squawks about his Red Sox contract again

David Ortiz deserves his contract extension

1/30/14 in MLB   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Oct 23, 2013; Boston, MA, USA; Boston Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz rounds the bases after hitting a two-run home run against the St. Louis Cardinals in the 7th inning during game one of the MLB baseball World Series at Fenway Park. Mandatory Credit: Robert Deutsch-USA TODAY SportsDavid Ortiz has been a Red Sox staple since 2003 and a major part of three World Series wins. Neither he nor the club wants him to spend a single day in another uniform. But that hasn’t prevented the sides from establishing battle lines every time his contract is in its final year. It’s irrelevant whether the shadow boxing is a negotiating tactic or part of a ritualistic dance between Ortiz and the Red Sox with each knowing it will eventually be worked out. The fact is that the team has been a contender on an almost annual basis since his arrival and he’s become a part of the fabric of the organization and its history. At age 38, he should no longer be singing for his supper. The club should take care of him and ensure that he’s in Boston for the remainder of his career.
 
With the number of players the Red Sox have wasted money on or given an extra year when they knew he probably wouldn’t be worth it, why does Ortiz have to wait? The names of players who failed to live up to their lofty contracts is legion. Carl Crawford, John Lackey, Bobby Jenks and Julio Lugo are the obvious names and there are many more. Others were paid extra to stay when they contributed little to nothing on the back end of the contracts. J.D. Drew, Curt Schilling and Mike Lowell fall into this category. Ortiz’s contribution has surpassed all of those players in its duration, on-field play and goodwill.
 
The Red Sox use numbers-crunching, finances and “best interests of the organization” rhetoric when it suits them. As the above players have shown, the team has wasted a vast amount of money and resources on players who weren’t worth it. To claim that Oritz having to wait out a new deal has any business or team-related legitimacy is being difficult for its own sake.
 
Nov 2, 2013; Boston, MA, USA; Boston Red Sox player David Ortiz on the podium prior to the World Series parade and celebration. Mandatory Credit: Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports
Most importantly, this would not be a “we’re doing you a favor” contract extension. Ortiz still puts up the numbers. In fact, he’s altered his approach as he’s aged. Whereas he once struck out over 120 times per year, he now k’s under 100 times without sacrificing his power. We can speculate as to why he’s not hitting 40-50 homers anymore. His name was reportedly on one of the PED lists and it was conveniently swept away with nary a mention of it and his popularity barely dropping. Even with the increased drug testing, Ortiz has posted big power numbers at an advanced age when other alleged PED-aided players have steadily declined as they did when the ravages of age became a reality rather than something drugs could hold at bay.
 
His off-field influence can’t be ignored. Part of his act is shtick and Ortiz is a savvy and skillful politician, adept at using the media to achieve his ends. That’s the case with every great player who is also marketing himself. Derek Jeter’s act is shtick too, but no one says anything for fear of insulting or alienating the “Captain.” 
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2/1/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

kantwistaye wrote:
Say the man who hates analysis and facts and calls age an arbitrary number as if it isn't measurable and we don't already know what happens to athletes as they age. 

And for Christ's sake, just look at two of the examples you named.  Derek Jeter went from MVP candidate to not even being able to get on the field last year.  Mike Lowell went from a 106 OPS+ at 35 to an OPS+ of 79 at 36.  Old guys get hurt more often and fall off quickly.

The fact that your argument is "Hey this team has done stupid stuff before and they should do it again" should really embarrass you from ever criticizing another person's thoughts ever. Like, ever.

You truly don't know how to read. Then you twist what you're unable to comprehend by altering the context. 

2/1/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
That's a weak, ignorant response with zero analysis nor facts behind it. He had the fourth best OPS in all of baseball and won the World Series MVP at age 37 and you have him collapsing based on an arbitrary number like his age. Stop wasting my time.
(Edited by PAULLEBOWITZ)

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1/31/14   |   kantwistaye   |   4210 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
That's a weak, ignorant response with zero analysis nor facts behind it. He had the fourth best OPS in all of baseball and won the World Series MVP at age 37 and you have him collapsing based on an arbitrary number like his age. Stop wasting my time.

Say the man who hates analysis and facts and calls age an arbitrary number as if it isn't measurable and we don't already know what happens to athletes as they age. 

And for Christ's sake, just look at two of the examples you named.  Derek Jeter went from MVP candidate to not even being able to get on the field last year.  Mike Lowell went from a 106 OPS+ at 35 to an OPS+ of 79 at 36.  Old guys get hurt more often and fall off quickly.

The fact that your argument is "Hey this team has done stupid stuff before and they should do it again" should really embarrass you from ever criticizing another person's thoughts ever. Like, ever.

1/31/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

kantwistaye wrote:
Because he's 38 and will be 39 by the time he has a new contract. That's what old players do. They fade.
(Edited by PAULLEBOWITZ)

That's a weak, ignorant response with zero analysis nor facts behind it. He had the fourth best OPS in all of baseball and won the World Series MVP at age 37 and you have him collapsing based on an arbitrary number like his age. Stop wasting my time.

1/31/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
Likely to fade quickly based on what? Your comments are consistent. I'll give you that. They're all nonsensical and have no foundation whatsoever. 
(Edited by PAULLEBOWITZ)

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1/31/14   |   kantwistaye   |   4210 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
Likely to fade quickly based on what? Your comments are consistent. I'll give you that. They're all nonsensical and have no foundation whatsoever. 

Because he's 38 and will be 39 by the time he has a new contract. That's what old players do. They fade.

1/31/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

kantwistaye wrote:
Literally none of that matters. He's likely to fade quickly. Don't make stupid posts and I won't make snarky comments.

Likely to fade quickly based on what? Your comments are consistent. I'll give you that. They're all nonsensical and have no foundation whatsoever. 

1/31/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Pat wrote:
I understand that no matter what the Red Sox pay Ortiz, they will have come out ahead when all is said and done. That having been said, why is it necessary to make the same mistake again? Is there a huge risk of him getting signed to another team? I honestly don't think there are many teams out there (if any) who would be willing to offer a 39-year-old DH a multi-year contract. The Red Sox know that he wants to stay in Boston, and he knows the Red Sox want to keep him around as long as he's productive. They'll happily overpay him on a year-by-year basis, and I think that should be enough. If he were 33, this would be different. But he's nearing 40, and there's no need for the team to tack on extra unnecessary risk.

You make reasonable points. I don't think any team would offer him a serious deal because, like Jeter with the Yankees, they'd know Ortiz wasn't leaving the Red Sox. Considering all the money they've wasted and that the issue continually crops up, it would simplify their lives to give him the contract to shut him up. He hasn't even started a gradual decline yet. Yes, he's had cold streaks. But I can't see him falling off the planet and going from 25 homers to 5. He'll still be moderately productive barring injury. I don't see a major risk in signing him. 

1/31/14   |   Pat   |   5229 respect

I understand that no matter what the Red Sox pay Ortiz, they will have come out ahead when all is said and done. That having been said, why is it necessary to make the same mistake again? Is there a huge risk of him getting signed to another team? I honestly don't think there are many teams out there (if any) who would be willing to offer a 39-year-old DH a multi-year contract. The Red Sox know that he wants to stay in Boston, and he knows the Red Sox want to keep him around as long as he's productive. They'll happily overpay him on a year-by-year basis, and I think that should be enough. If he were 33, this would be different. But he's nearing 40, and there's no need for the team to tack on extra unnecessary risk.

1/30/14   |   kantwistaye   |   4210 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
Either you skim read my postings, don't understand what you're reading or latch onto a single thing to make your snarky comments. Did you read what I wrote about the number of players the Red Sox paid far more money than they would have to pay Ortiz for the one unlikely year in which his numbers collapse or he gets hurt? An extra year of severance isn't going to hurt the Red Sox one way or the other even if Ortiz comes undone. 

Literally none of that matters. He's likely to fade quickly. Don't make stupid posts and I won't make snarky comments.

1/30/14   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

kantwistaye wrote:
Since he’s still putting up the numbers, why should his age be a factor?

Other than with every year older he is, its more likely his numbers will fall off a cliff?
 

Either you skim read my postings, don't understand what you're reading or latch onto a single thing to make your snarky comments. Did you read what I wrote about the number of players the Red Sox paid far more money than they would have to pay Ortiz for the one unlikely year in which his numbers collapse or he gets hurt? An extra year of severance isn't going to hurt the Red Sox one way or the other even if Ortiz comes undone. 

1/30/14   |   kantwistaye   |   4210 respect

Since he’s still putting up the numbers, why should his age be a factor?

Other than with every year older he is, its more likely his numbers will fall off a cliff?