Former Dolphins teammate says Richie Incognito is an honorary black man

Did the Dolphins really consider Richie Incognito an "honorary black man" to justify his use of the N word?

11/6/13 in NFL   |   Pat   |   5232 respect

Jul 22, 2013; Davie, FL, USA; Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito (68) during  training camp at the Doctors Hospital Training Facility at Nova Southeastern University.  Mandatory Credit: Robert Mayer-USA TODAY SportsIn one of the more absurd things I've read recently, a former Dolphins player told Miami Herald reporter Armando Salguero that Richie Incognito was considered an "honorary black man" by his teammates.This is apparently why many of them aren't upset by Incognito calling Jonathan Martin a "half n****r" in voicemails.

Seriously. From Salguero's report:
"I don't have a problem with Richie," Mike Wallace said. "I love Richie."

"I don't think Richie is a racist," cornerback Brent Grimes said.

"Richie Incognito isn't a racist," tight end Michael Egnew said.

These are three African-American players on the Dolphins, who are aware of Incognito's voicemail. Yet they (and their teammates) are actually upset that Incognito is being viewed as a racist.

A former Dolphin shed some light on why that might be the case:

Richie is honarary. I don't expect you to understand because you're not black. But being a black guy, being a brother is more than just about skin color. It's about how you carry yourself. How you play. Where you come from. What you've experienced. A lot of things.


So… because Incognito is considered an honorary black guy, he's allowed to use inflammatory and blatantly racist language?

This is a fascinating yet dangerous phenomenon, and speaks volumes about the complexity of race-related issues today, despite the perception of some folks that we're in "post-racial America."

Some minorities are steadily fighting the concept of 'white privilege,' which is basically the idea that white people can get away with things that minorities can not, because of their skin color. Whether it's being able to walk around a neighborhood without arousing suspicion or just driving down the road with no concern about being pulled over for 'driving while black,' there's really no denying that in most American cities and towns, white people have it easier in many ways. Yet Richie Incognito, despite presumably enjoying said white privilege, was also an 'honorary black guy.'

Honestly, I have no words left for this incredible stupidity.
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11/7/13   |   kobe_lova   |   61576 respect

Scott wrote:
The fact that a handful of African-Americans inside the Dolphins locker room weren't upset by Incognito's comments leads me to believe that Jonathon Martin wasn't well liked by his peers.  He's almost being treated as an outcast while Incongnito is the team "bully" who torments and harasses the guy while everybody else looks on.

Yeah, they were. There is no real instance where a black person wants to be called a half ****** like that. It matters not if they liked Martin, imo... and they are more than likely simply used to hearing it.

I'm pretty sure "bullying" happens all of the time to some extent. I think it's more of knowing who can and who can't take it. This was a bit extreme (I guess) but Martin may have already had some mental issues which may have made it all harder to handle. We'll probably never know the whole story, and I'm kind of over it already. Let it be handled quickly, unless these minute to minute stories somehow keeps us from getting a "NFL player goes postal and shoots up LR" story. This story had that vibe in the beginning, so I suppose it definitely needs addressing. Ha, I'm rambling.

11/6/13   |   Eric_   |   7716 respect

It's looking more and more likely that this is an entire team problem than just Incognito.

My question is where else is this happening in sports, because you know damn well it is.

11/6/13   |   Jess   |   34638 respect

Scott wrote:
The fact that a handful of African-Americans inside the Dolphins locker room weren't upset by Incognito's comments leads me to believe that Jonathon Martin wasn't well liked by his peers.  He's almost being treated as an outcast while Incongnito is the team "bully" who torments and harasses the guy while everybody else looks on.

The more I'm seeing, it does seem to be that way.

11/6/13   |   Scott   |   53027 respect

The fact that a handful of African-Americans inside the Dolphins locker room weren't upset by Incognito's comments leads me to believe that Jonathon Martin wasn't well liked by his peers.  He's almost being treated as an outcast while Incongnito is the team "bully" who torments and harasses the guy while everybody else looks on.

11/6/13   |   kobe_lova   |   61576 respect

(Edited by kobe_lova)

Right? I received no letter stating he was in the club.

Also, I hate everything about the former Dolphin statement. I understand the wallace, grimes, and egnew ones...that's the professional response, but that other is crap. Also, I really hate "brother".

p.s. nothing about incognito says "black" to me. nothing.

11/6/13   |   Lobotomy Jones   |   7575 respect

So did these players let the rest of the black community know that he's an honorary black man? Because I can see some confusion happening when he uses that word when his teammates aren't around.

11/6/13   |   marcus_nyce   |   27102 respect

Good call this is the lead that was buried in all of this nonsense.

11/6/13   |   Jess   |   34638 respect

This is absolutely ridiculous. What the actual eff? 

Also - if he actually was considered an "honorary black man" and there were some men who didn't mind him using language as such that's one thing. It's entirely another for him to use it in the way he used it with Martin. He was obviously being malicious and did not mean it in a playful, friendly way.