How the Ellsbury signing affects Cano and Jay-Z

Cano, Ellsbury, Jay-Z and Boras - On Tour

12/4/13 in MLB   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Oct 8, 2013; St. Petersburg, FL, USA; Boston Red Sox center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury (2) celebrates after scoring a run during the seventh inning against the Tampa Bay Rays in game four of the American League divisional series at Tropicana Field. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY SportsAsk yourself the following question: Without any consideration other than playing ability and contribution, would you trade Robinson Cano straight-up for Jacoby Ellsbury?
 
The obvious answer is absolutely not. Cano is a second baseman. Scour baseball and see how many second basemen put up the numbers that Cano does with Gold Glove defense and the ability to perform in a high-pressure atmosphere. Then see how many are a fraction as good as Cano and are available.
 
Now look at Ellsbury. Are the center fielders available who can be a reasonable facsimile of him and can be had on the market? Dexter Fowler was just traded for a lowball return. Curtis Granderson is a free agent. Even Brett Gardner might be available because the Yankees have signed Ellsbury and he’s an eerily similar player without the hype.
 
I don’t believe that the Yankees are out on Cano. The signing of Ellsbury, however, does put it in doubt as to whether they’re willing to do what it takes to trump the other offers that are out there such as the Mariners reaching the $200 million plateau. In addition, once other clubs get the sense that Cano is actually in play, there’s a very real possibility that they’ll jump in with a vengeance to try and use the Yankees reluctance to lure their best player away.
 
Let’s take a look at the aftershocks and possible futures with the Yankees strange decision to sign Ellsbury to a seven-year, $153 million contract.
 
For the Yankees
 
Count me among the masses who don’t understand this decision to sign a 30-year-old speed player with a long injury history and a reputation for being sensitive to a contract of this magnitude. It is not a denigration of Ellsbury to say that he’s not a prototypical star who deserves such a lucrative, long-term contract. Ellsbury is a terrific defensive center fielder, has great speed and experience in a high-pressure atmosphere. He also has limited power and doesn’t fill the Yankees’ stated need for power in the outfield.
 
Was this a Brian Cashman move or did the Steinbrenners – tired of the dance with Cano, Jay-Z and CAA – tell the GM to get something done with Ellsbury? Given Cashman’s stated preference for power hitters, it’s hard to imagine that he wanted a player who is somewhat redundant and not all that much better than Gardner. The Red Sox regretted signing Carl Crawford to a contract that is almost identical to the one that Ellsbury just signed when he was essentially the same type of player as Ellsbury. The Yankees did the same thing with Ellsbury and Gardner.
 
If they are still able to keep Cano, then fine. Ellsbury is just another good player who’ll get on base and into scoring position for Cano and Mark Teixeira to drive in. If it costs them Cano, then it’s a disaster waiting to happen and a mistake they’ll regret for a decade.
 
They signed Kelly Johnson and have been sniffing around Omar Infante and Brandon Phillips. None of these players are Cano in any fashion. If Cano leaves, the Ellsbury signing won’t have been done to improve the roster, but out of spite to teach Cano, Jay-Z and any other person who dares to ask for what the Steinbrenners deem to be too much money that no one pushes them around.
 
You can’t find second basemen to do what Cano does. The Yankees giving Ellsbury this amount of money while trying to lowball Cano isn’t about the bottom line alone. There’s something underneath this. It’s personal and they’re shoving Cano’s face in it, daring him to leave. Letting personal feelings enter into a business decision is a sure way to make a bad business decision that will haunt the club for years and that will be the case if Cano departs. 
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12/7/13   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

jaysinw wrote:
Him being a second baseman really has nothing to do with it, for the Yankees just need someone to replace the offensive numbers. It does not matter which position he plays. Beltran who many believe to be washed up which allowed the Cardinals to sign him, which is strange why the Yankees are taking a chance on him, with his knees failing still he did put up good numbers for the Cards and it is only threes years.

Lance only played what 22 games at first in 2012, I think it was Allen Craig who play first base most of the season. The point being plain and simple Cano is not taking the Yankees to the series, so the Yankees could let him go and sign an inferior player as you put it for less years and money.

You are right the Yankees did offer Cano the money he was not going to take it so they did the smart thing and sign Ellsbury for less money and years and then got more help for the OF and still have money to go after and pitcher. You will see how Seattle made a bad move signing Cano for 10 years.  

I'd agree if they hadn't given Ellsbury a guaranteed contract til he's 37; McCann til he's 35; and Beltran til he's 39, yet refused to pay Cano til he's 40. They're panicking.

12/6/13   |   jaysinw   |   4909 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
Under no circumstances do I think that Cano should get $300 million. He knew he wasn't getting that as did Jay-Z and CAA. The Cardinals comparison really doesn't fit because they didn't replace Pujols with an inferior player for a similar amount of money that they'd offered him. The Yankees offered Cano $170 million, then signed Ellsbury for $153 million. Plus the Cardinals had prospects on the way that the Yankees don't. They signed Carlos Beltran on a short-term deal and moved Lance Berkman to first base. These are not options the Yankees have in replacing Cano - a much more difficult player to replace because he's a second baseman. 

Him being a second baseman really has nothing to do with it, for the Yankees just need someone to replace the offensive numbers. It does not matter which position he plays. Beltran who many believe to be washed up which allowed the Cardinals to sign him, which is strange why the Yankees are taking a chance on him, with his knees failing still he did put up good numbers for the Cards and it is only threes years.

Lance only played what 22 games at first in 2012, I think it was Allen Craig who play first base most of the season. The point being plain and simple Cano is not taking the Yankees to the series, so the Yankees could let him go and sign an inferior player as you put it for less years and money.

You are right the Yankees did offer Cano the money he was not going to take it so they did the smart thing and sign Ellsbury for less money and years and then got more help for the OF and still have money to go after and pitcher. You will see how Seattle made a bad move signing Cano for 10 years.  

12/5/13   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Dan_B wrote:
I have to think that Ellsbury's power numbers will increase, at least somewhat, do to the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium. His power is almost exclusively pull power, which hurt him at Fenway Park where to put up big power numbers you have to hit the ball to left field. Also, Yankee fans can hold out hope that his 32 bombs in 2011 weren't an anomaly.

I'd tend to agree. They can expect 15 homers. The key for Ellsbury will be the transition and his health. He won't be able to deal with the hissing if he's perceived to have been Cano's replacement.

12/5/13   |   Dan_B   |   1067 respect

PAULLEBOWITZ wrote:
For all the legitimate criticism that Cano receives – from me included – for his lack of hustle, he does play every…single…day. Ellsbury’s injuries have, in certain cases, been accurately described as “impact” related. They were, but that doesn’t alter his sensitivity and physical fragility that could cause him big problems in New York. He doesn’t hit for any power and is a speed player. It’s exactly what the Yankees were supposedly getting away from even with his on-base skills. In the end, I’d still be shocked if Cano leaves, but this doesn’t help matters for him staying. I understand where the Yankees are coming from in not playing Cano’s game or waiting for a resolution to the A-Rod situation, but with Ellsbury? I wouldn’t have gone there. 

I have to think that Ellsbury's power numbers will increase, at least somewhat, do to the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium. His power is almost exclusively pull power, which hurt him at Fenway Park where to put up big power numbers you have to hit the ball to left field. Also, Yankee fans can hold out hope that his 32 bombs in 2011 weren't an anomaly.

12/5/13   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

jaysinw wrote:
It comes down to money and you have not learn it is not smart to sign a 31 yr old player to a 10 yr contract for over 300 million. 7 yr should be the top hell no more then 5 would be perfect for any team by the time he his 37 he will not be putting up the same numbers as he is now. True we have had quite a few player play at that level into his 40s most have been on PEDs so why would the Yankees put their money into that. As for Ellsbury 7 years for 153 million so the Yankees save more then 10 million a year while doing so for less years. True Ellsbury is not a power hitter but with the short fence at Yankees Stadium he should be good for 18-24 HRs. Just as people thought the Cards were crazy to let Pujols go look at what happen they made it to the World Series without him while the Angels well we all seen what has been going on there. No question the Yankees are not being run the way George did things but losing Cano is not the end of the world. 

Under no circumstances do I think that Cano should get $300 million. He knew he wasn't getting that as did Jay-Z and CAA. The Cardinals comparison really doesn't fit because they didn't replace Pujols with an inferior player for a similar amount of money that they'd offered him. The Yankees offered Cano $170 million, then signed Ellsbury for $153 million. Plus the Cardinals had prospects on the way that the Yankees don't. They signed Carlos Beltran on a short-term deal and moved Lance Berkman to first base. These are not options the Yankees have in replacing Cano - a much more difficult player to replace because he's a second baseman. 

12/5/13   |   jaysinw   |   4909 respect

It comes down to money and you have not learn it is not smart to sign a 31 yr old player to a 10 yr contract for over 300 million. 7 yr should be the top hell no more then 5 would be perfect for any team by the time he his 37 he will not be putting up the same numbers as he is now. True we have had quite a few player play at that level into his 40s most have been on PEDs so why would the Yankees put their money into that. As for Ellsbury 7 years for 153 million so the Yankees save more then 10 million a year while doing so for less years. True Ellsbury is not a power hitter but with the short fence at Yankees Stadium he should be good for 18-24 HRs. Just as people thought the Cards were crazy to let Pujols go look at what happen they made it to the World Series without him while the Angels well we all seen what has been going on there. No question the Yankees are not being run the way George did things but losing Cano is not the end of the world. 

12/5/13   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Dan_B wrote:
Here is the underrated thing about Cano (especially with regard to to Ellsbury): Here are his number of games played the last 7 seasons:
2007: 160
2008: 159
2009: 161
2010: 160
2011: 159
2012: 161
2013: 160

That is unbelievable durability (and also a cool pattern -- if it continues he will play 159 games this season, 161 next and so on...)

For all the legitimate criticism that Cano receives – from me included – for his lack of hustle, he does play every…single…day. Ellsbury’s injuries have, in certain cases, been accurately described as “impact” related. They were, but that doesn’t alter his sensitivity and physical fragility that could cause him big problems in New York. He doesn’t hit for any power and is a speed player. It’s exactly what the Yankees were supposedly getting away from even with his on-base skills. In the end, I’d still be shocked if Cano leaves, but this doesn’t help matters for him staying. I understand where the Yankees are coming from in not playing Cano’s game or waiting for a resolution to the A-Rod situation, but with Ellsbury? I wouldn’t have gone there. 

12/4/13   |   Dan_B   |   1067 respect

Here is the underrated thing about Cano (especially with regard to to Ellsbury): Here are his number of games played the last 7 seasons:
2007: 160
2008: 159
2009: 161
2010: 160
2011: 159
2012: 161
2013: 160

That is unbelievable durability (and also a cool pattern -- if it continues he will play 159 games this season, 161 next and so on...)