Marshawn Lynch Should No Longer Be Forced to Interview

Leave Marshawn Lynch Alone

1/30/14 in NFL   |   GFortier   |   520 respect

Blog Photo - Marshawn Lynch Should No Longer Be Forced to Interview
Just imagine having social anxiety and facing this


On the field, Marshawn Lynch plays like a giant. But under the glare of cameras, microphones, and countless reporters hurling questions his way, he shrinks down to the size of a frightened child. On Tuesday Marshawn Lynch was forced in front of a throng of reporters, a fifty-thousand dollar fine hanging over his head if he didn't comply. Unlike the day before, Lynch was not wearing a hoodie and sunglasses. He was exposed, and his extreme discomfort couldn't be more apparent. His leg shook anxiously as he did his best to answer questions.

And that's the point. This is the best Marshawn Lynch can muster -- another 6-7 minutes before climbing over chairs to escape the media circus. If you listen to Deion Sanders' interview with Lynch on Monday, or just watch the first couple minutes of his forced Tuesday appearance, it's obvious that Lynch is not sticking his nose up at reporters. He doesn't feel he's "too good" to speak to the media. He's simply not comfortable doing so.

To say that Marshawn Lynch is "snubbing" the media is painfully misguided. This isn't a case of a player ducking out of a locker room after a bad loss or stubbornly refusing to speak to reporters because he has personal issues with the stories that are written about him. This is a man with a specific anxiety, perhaps a phobia, and a certain point he just needs to be let off the hook.

Why are players required to speak to the media? Because, the NFL asserts, this is what the fans want. To shun the media is to keep the fans out. But in this particular case, the fans are saying they couldn't care less whether or not Lynch opens himself up to the media. They, especially Seahawks fans, are happy enough to see the prodigious effort he gives every Sunday.

Some would argue that by not insisting Lynch give interviews we are setting a dangerous precedent. Every single NFL player could block out the media, giving the avid NFL fan considerably less access to the game they love. The fact of the matter is, however, that for every Marshawn Lynch there is a Richard Sherman. We will never be completely shut out. In the case of Lynch, we simply need to show a little humanity. If another player comes along who is so clearly displays the same level of anxiety in the public spotlight as does Lynch, then yes, he too should be given a break. 

Accept who this man is, appreciate his contribution to the game of football, and move on. There's not one fan out there clamoring for Lynch to be forced into the spotlight and made to answer inane questions, and therefore not one more thing needs to be written about Marshawn Lynch that doesn't have to do with the game itself. 

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1/31/14   |   GFortier   |   520 respect

Jess wrote:
As an addition - they can still be a "bridge" of sorts without hearing straight from him. Remember when they used to dig for stories? There are a lot of stories surrounding Marshawn if they'd do some research and just write them. The man is a philanthropist. He loves his fans, and his community. He also goes back to his roots and gives back to that community all the time. He's overcome a lot to be where he is, circumstances both beyond and of his own doing. If they're so interested in telling his story, they need to do their jobs and tell it. 

great point. There is more than enough there if the "journalists" want to write something on Marshawn Lynch.

1/30/14   |   Jess   |   34392 respect

As an addition - they can still be a "bridge" of sorts without hearing straight from him. Remember when they used to dig for stories? There are a lot of stories surrounding Marshawn if they'd do some research and just write them. The man is a philanthropist. He loves his fans, and his community. He also goes back to his roots and gives back to that community all the time. He's overcome a lot to be where he is, circumstances both beyond and of his own doing. If they're so interested in telling his story, they need to do their jobs and tell it. 

1/30/14   |   Jess   |   34392 respect

I think I speak for most Seahawks fans when I say - we just want to see Lynch left alone. We're sick of the media hounding him. We get to hear all about and from him through his official Twitter account, and once in awhile on SoundFX or local media. We don't care - we just love how he plays the game. I thought his point was brilliant; if the media is there as a bridge between the players and the fans, and the 12's don't care if he speaks or not, then why are they harassing him? What's the point of their "bridge"? 

It's painful for us to watch him suffer through this mess, and it makes us defensive and pisses us off. As I said earlier today - I hope it's making him mad too, because my favorite Seahawks are angry Seahawks.