Michael Kay's radio simulcast to replace Mike Francesa's on YES

YES Becomes KAY As Michael Kay’s Simulcast Will Replace Mike Francesa’s

12/15/13 in MLB   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Oct 13, 2012; Bronx, NY, USA; MLB vice president of baseball operations Joe Torre (right) talks with New York Yankees former player Paul O'Neill (left) and broadcaster Michael Kay before game one of the 2012 ALCS against the Detroit Tigers at Yankee Stadium.  Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY SportsThis behavior is indicative of an antiquated conservatism exemplified by Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfeld as they look back with nostalgia at the 1950s and wish the culture was back to their good old U.S.of A. Not the U.S.of A. with the ideas that were the foundation of its creation, but their U.S. of A. Of course, like the Yankees current portrayal of maintaining the 1921 to 1964 dominance that no longer exists, it’s a twisted historical utopia in which only white men were in charge; women were home in the kitchen keeping their mouths shut; gays were safely ensconced in the closet; minorities stayed minorities and liked it; Jackie Gleason was the star of a top-rated TV show with a script that clearly stated if his wife kept getting on his nerves it was perfectly acceptable – and hilarious – that he punch her in the face; and reality was inextricably linked to the preferred storyline independent of facts.
 
Francesa will wind up on another station for his simulcast and take a large number of viewers with him. YES will get what they want with Kay, who will never take a tack that is too far opposed to what the suits in the Yankees front office dictate. There will be no defending of A-Rod; no discussing Derek Jeter’s own selfishness and decline; no mentioning of off-field episodes that are up for discussion everywhere else; and no honest appraisals of how the team is performing and run.
 
They can say it’s about money, but that’s hard to swallow when they’re going to have Kay on camera every hour on the hour, never saying anything negative about the club while purporting to be an analyst and cashing paychecks from the Yankees at the same time.
 
If that’s not propaganda and the weeding out of dissent to meet personal ends, I don’t know what is.   
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12/15/13   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

autmorsautlibertas wrote:
Paul,
The number of Yankee playoff appearances over the past 20 years supports a conclusion that they have a legitimate claim to some bragging rights,  Their failure to turn the majority of these playoff appearances into championships has more to do with the way the playoffs have evolved than anything else.  The expansion of the playoffs, first with the addition of a third division, then the addition of wild card teams, and finally squeezing in a second wild card team, is simply to increase revenue.  The sad result is that the best team doesn't necessarily win the World Series anymore.  The Champion is now whatever playoff team gets hot for the first few weeks in October. 

I'd agree if the stated goal was to make the playoffs alone. The unequivocally stated that they're trying to win a World Series every single year. They consider every season in which they don't win the World Series a failure. Based on that logic, it has to be considered a failure when analyzing it as well. It comes from them and the standard they set - one they've failed to achieve for the majority of that time. They've had the highest payroll in baseball by a vast margin. Turning it around, it's actually easier for them to make the post-season now than it was before the expansion of the playoff system. They shouldn't get credit other than in an "at least" way. That's not what the Yankees want. 

12/15/13   |   autmorsautlibertas   |   1 respect

Paul,
The number of Yankee playoff appearances over the past 20 years supports a conclusion that they have a legitimate claim to some bragging rights,  Their failure to turn the majority of these playoff appearances into championships has more to do with the way the playoffs have evolved than anything else.  The expansion of the playoffs, first with the addition of a third division, then the addition of wild card teams, and finally squeezing in a second wild card team, is simply to increase revenue.  The sad result is that the best team doesn't necessarily win the World Series anymore.  The Champion is now whatever playoff team gets hot for the first few weeks in October.