NBA teams aren't guaranteed success in the draft by tanking

Is it worth to Tank?

11/20/13 in NBA   |   puccio86   |   19 respect

Nov 12, 2013; Chicago, IL, USA; Kansas Jayhawks guard Andrew Wiggins (22) dunks in the first half against the Duke Blue Devils at United Center. Mandatory Credit: Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY SportsIf you want to win in the NBA history tells us that you can't make a run by being mediocre.  You need to have at least 2 or 3 superstars in this league in order to compete or even win a championship.  Chances are if you're a 7 or 8 seed in the NBA you won't be going anywhere in the foreseeable future unless you have some potential superstars like Kyrie Irving or a John Wall.  

Its not easy to find a superstar in this league and if you have the chance to do so, like in this upcoming 2014 draft you need to do it.  The statistics really back me up on this.  Over the past 20 years there has only been 8 different teams to be crowned as champions.  That speaks volumes on why you need a superstar in this league.  

All of those championship teams had multiple superstars.  The Chicago Bulls with Jordan, Pippen and Rodman. Houston Rockets with Olajuwon and Drexler.  San Antonio with Duncan, Parker, Robinson and Ginobili. The Lakers had Shaq and Kobe and then the Pau Gasol teams.  The Pistons might be the only exception because they won without a legit superstar with Chauncey Billups, Rasheed Wallace, Ben Wallace, and Richard Hamilton they were really good but not great at almost every position.  

Then you have the Miami Heat with the D-Wade and Shaq team then the big three with Lebron James, Chris Bosh and D-Wade.  The Boston Celtics who could've really had a 3-peat had Garnett not gotten hurt his second year with the original big three of Ray Allen, Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett himself.  The last franchise is the Dallas Mavericks who didn't really have many superstars during their prime but they still had the experience and likes of Dirk Nowitzki, Jason Kidd and Terry with Tyson Chandler at the center position.  I think you get my point when I mean that Super Stars will affect whether or not you win a Championship or not.  

So when literally every single Coach, Scout, and GM around the country is telling you that there are multiple potential superstars in this upcoming draft and you are a mediocre team I say tank at all will.  Hell I even say trade some of your better players if it gets you back a top pick in return.  Who knows what the future holds for players like Jabari Parker, Andrew Wiggins, Dante Exum and Julius Randle, but if you really look at the amount of picks that become busts in the NBA they aren't nearly as high as the ones in the NFL and MLB.  Which makes tanking even more logical than it needs to be.
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12/6/13   |   puccio86   |   19 respect

w_g_walters wrote:
My point is that even with a superstar, you still have to be a team. One or two men don't win championships by themselves, but one man can sure lose it.

As for the Rockets' championships, I think they could have won in '94, but it would have taken seven games. The '95 team wasn't quite that good.

Yes but you can't deny that the fact that the best step you can take towards building a championship team is by having a superstar. Thanks for the comment though!

12/4/13   |   w_g_walters   |   223 respect

puccio86 wrote:
The point was that the majority of these teams had A SUPERSTAR on it. Without one your chances of winning are virtually gone. Those rocket teams probably wouldn't have won if MJ didn't retire in his prime either.

My point is that even with a superstar, you still have to be a team. One or two men don't win championships by themselves, but one man can sure lose it.

As for the Rockets' championships, I think they could have won in '94, but it would have taken seven games. The '95 team wasn't quite that good.

12/3/13   |   puccio86   |   19 respect

w_g_walters wrote:
Take it from someone who was there, the Rockets won their championships because we had a team who knew how to play with each other, and we didn't even have Drexler the first year. We had a guy who was called D-League (Mario Elie) who could drain 3s, a rookie (Sam Cassell) who tended to ignite the team in bad situations, a forward (Robert Horry) who played like a point guard, and a coach (Rudy T) who understood how to use the players. The strategy that year was simple: inside-outside-inside-outside. Either Hakeem gets a good shot or a 3-shooter gets the open shot. It wasn't just Hakeem, it was a team effort.

If you want to talk about multiple superstar teams, there have been plenty including the West-era Celtics, the Bird-era Celtics, and the Magic-Kareem Lakers as the most noteworthy besides the Bulls. But look at the great teams that never won championships. The Stockton-Malone Jazz  and the Olajuwan-Sampson Rockets spring to mind. The '76ers won with Dr. J, but we never hear about his teammates. So, while multiple superstars can help, it's no guarantee against a team who plays *as* a team, which is where Miami fell apart with three superstars who all wanted the spotlight.

The point was that the majority of these teams had A SUPERSTAR on it. Without one your chances of winning are virtually gone. Those rocket teams probably wouldn't have won if MJ didn't retire in his prime either.

12/2/13   |   bsamps07   |   1 respect

I think it can defintely be worth to tank it-for the right team in the right situation.  I'm a fan of the Bucks and they have been stuck in NBA perguatory for years.  I think that this is the best season for them to try a new strategy and start tanking it.  I recently wrote about it in my new post.

11/25/13   |   w_g_walters   |   223 respect

Take it from someone who was there, the Rockets won their championships because we had a team who knew how to play with each other, and we didn't even have Drexler the first year. We had a guy who was called D-League (Mario Elie) who could drain 3s, a rookie (Sam Cassell) who tended to ignite the team in bad situations, a forward (Robert Horry) who played like a point guard, and a coach (Rudy T) who understood how to use the players. The strategy that year was simple: inside-outside-inside-outside. Either Hakeem gets a good shot or a 3-shooter gets the open shot. It wasn't just Hakeem, it was a team effort.

If you want to talk about multiple superstar teams, there have been plenty including the West-era Celtics, the Bird-era Celtics, and the Magic-Kareem Lakers as the most noteworthy besides the Bulls. But look at the great teams that never won championships. The Stockton-Malone Jazz  and the Olajuwan-Sampson Rockets spring to mind. The '76ers won with Dr. J, but we never hear about his teammates. So, while multiple superstars can help, it's no guarantee against a team who plays *as* a team, which is where Miami fell apart with three superstars who all wanted the spotlight.