MMA

Overeem vs. Browne In Boston: Letís Break It Down

8/14/13 in MMA   |   jaysutcliffe81   |   25 respect

Dec 30, 2011; Las Vegas, NV, USA; UFC fighter Alistair Overeem celebrates after defeating Brock Lesnar (not pictured) during a heavyweight bout at UFC 141 at the MGM Grand Garden event center. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY SportsBy Jason Sutcliffe
Twitter: @SutcliffeJay
Jaysright2write.com

The co-main event in Boston on August 17th is a very exciting one. Travis Browne and Alistaire Overeem will step inside the octagon, both looking to get one step closer to a shot at the heavyweight title.

Overeem had his express train to a title shot derailed when Antonio Silva shocked the world knocking him out cold in the third round. It is funny because Silva happens to be the only blemish on Browne’s record.

Both fighters appeared to be in control the fight before the big Brazilian knocked them out.

Statistically this is a very exciting fight; both fighters are in their early thirties, both are huge men Browne sizing in at 6’7”, 255lbs, while Overeem comes in at 6’4”, 265lbs. Both have yet to be put on their back. They both have 100% takedown defence, and both are very powerful strikers with great KO power.

So where do we find the advantages and who are they for? We have to dig into the numbers a bit to figure that out.
At first glance, it seems like Overeem has a very large striking advantage. Overeem’s striking percentage is an impressive 74% while Browne’s is a less impressive 44%. It appears as if Overeem is the far more efficient striker, but then we dig a little deeper.

Browne is more efficient than Overeem in a traditional kick boxing sense. When he strikes from a distance (boxers/kick boxers range) he lands 49% of his strikes while Overeem connects at a much lower 26%. Where Overeem has the biggest advantage over Browne, is in the clinch. This is where Overeem is the most dangerous; he lands 41% of his strikes from the clinch. Browne is far less effective landing at a rate of 26%.

Alistaire X factor will be his submission game, based on experience he should have the advantage on the ground. Some people do not realize, but Alistaire has 19 career wins by submission, which is more than he has by knockout. If he is capable of getting this fight to the ground, he may have a sizeable advantage.

Browne’s X factor will be Greg Jackson who is masterful at creating game plans for his fighters. I am sure Browne is well prepared for Alistaire’s strengths. He will know where he needs to be to have success against Overeem..

After the statistical breakdown, it appears that Browne should try to keep this fight on the outside, use his good head movement and superior striking accuracy.

Overeem is going to want to use his strikes to close the distance, getting close to Browne. If he can do that he should be able to work his knees and overall clinch game, he may also try to score a takedown to nullify Browne’s striking ability completely, and keep him thinking during their exchanges.

My opinion is that Overeem has a few more tools than Browne and with his experience should be able to pull out the win. If Alistaire can get the win he may be close to a title shot, given the current state of the heavyweight division, and Dana’s ability to market him.
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8/14/13   |   jaysutcliffe81   |   25 respect

MortonsLaw wrote:
Can Overeem win a fight without Peds?

He is probably still on them. For the Bigfoot fight he had to do random drug testing his whole camp, but he no longer has to do that, he just has to do the mandatory pre-fight test. So I would imagine he is back on the roids. He has guys in his camp who will ween him off during his camp so that he is within the ridiculous 6:! ratio the commission requires. 

I think Reem will win, he is superior in the clinch, Hoppa can win but he will have to strike from the outside and stay really mobile during the fight.

8/14/13   |   MortonsLaw   |   156 respect

Can Overeem win a fight without Peds?