General Sports

Teed Off Thursday: Arguments, MLK Tributes And Mike Greenberg

1/21/10 in General Sports   |   Beaze   |   271 respect

3-2-1...1-2-3...what the heck...is bothering me?  At least this week.


1) That isn't what I meant!

Don't you hate it when...huh?  Don't you hate it when...huh?  DON"T YOU HATE IT WHEN YOU SAY SOMETHING AND THE OTHER PERSON DOESN'T HEAR YOU, so you say it louder, but now they think you are "yelling" at them, so they respond with an attitude.  Then you feel the need to explain that you weren't being mean you were just yelling, but they just flag you off, which makes you get upset too.

Then one of you says something completely unrelated to the topic at hand and now all of the sudden a real argument starts just because you didn't speak up enough or your significant other is hard of hearing or maybe one of you had the TV too loud.  This is why it's not a good idea to hold little things inside.  Just a thought


 

2) How come nobody ever asks straight white people about Dr. King?

I think it's great that the NBA plays games on MLK Day.  I mean the guy did give his life so that black people could go to work, not sit at home.  And I think it's wonderful that the NBA players get to express their personal stories of how Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. influenced their lives during commercial breaks (although some of them act like a deer in the headlight and repeat, "he was a great man"), but how come they never ask any of the white players?

I understand that the foreign players may not be familiar, but why don't they ask the Luke Waltons and Tyler Hansbourghs of the league how Dr. King influenced their lives?  Are we afraid that they will say, "he made it worse for me?"  Do we think they don't care?  Or are they uncomfortable with the question?  Do they feel guilty?  I don't think it's any of that.  I think we all need to recognize that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had an impact on more than just the black community.  And speaking of which...

3) The black community needs to stop being sensitive.

Yes, I said it.  Mike Greenberg of Mike and Mike in the morning on ESPN made an innocent mistake on MLK day.  Or at least we can't prove that he made anything else.  And seeing as how we are always ranting and raving about being convicted before a trial, we should give this guy the benefit of the doubt.  He has no priors.

And even if he did make a Freudian slip, so what?  We can't be so sensitive.  Times have changed.  Barack Obama has raised the bar for all of us and that means our intolerance threshold has to rise too.  We got to be a little bit tougher.  The N word will always be the benchmark, but we have to let go of all the cartoonish and childish insults like "coon" and "jungle bunny."  We are no longer in a position of weakness.  Let it go.  Right now we act like the boy who cries wolf every time someone growls, meanwhile Rush Limbaugh says way meaner and nastier bullsh*t and it considered the "norm."

P.S. - try saying Dr. Martin Luther King Junior really fast and see if you don't mess up.  If you want to know how he got Martin Luther "coon" from that, it's simple.  King + Junior = Kunior, but he caught himself and shortened it to Kun (coon).  Hey, it hould cappen.

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1/22/10   |   kobe_lova   |   59485 respect

you better

1/21/10   |   monroe_s10   |   2 respect

(Edited by monroe_s10)

First off I would like to say that I was directed to this article by simply doing a google search on Mike Greenberg and this was the first link.  Having said that I am elated and overjoyed to have stumbled upon your article. 
 
Having grown up in the south (Texas), a middle class white kid, it was hard for me to gain any information on African American history.  The only history we were given in school was glazed over at best.  Where I was able to gain that information was from my 6th-9th grade English teacher, Mrs, Green, an African American woman whom I look upon like an aunt, and my father.  Both of them lived through the race riots and the equality movements in the deep south.  Through them I was able to garner the information I so wanted.  Because of this, and research done by myself while achieving my BA in History, I am able to say wholeheartedly that the sensitivity does need to stop.  We now have a black president in office, every facet of Americana is being influenced heavily by the black culture, and most African Americans below the age of 45 would be extremely shocked if they were actually confronted by true racism, the kind that was prevalent during the equality movement.

For instance, my father, the most un-racist person I know, made a similar slip of the tongue.  Upon seeing an old friend, who happens to be African American, he responded with the old saying, "I haven't seen you in a coon's age."  As we know the saying is not racist, coon's age literally meaning raccoon's age, but the term coon is racist.  By all accounts my father's friend could have flown off the handle and been outraged.  Instead, upon hearing my father's immediately and constant apology, simply said you have nothing to apologize for because he knew it was a mistake not a racist remark.

I apologize for this length of this but I am so relieved/elated to have read your article.  It was said perfectly and the thought processes and conjecture with which you speak are a welcome change.  Keep up the good work and you now have a faithful reader.

1/21/10   |   kobe_lova   |   59485 respect

i think this was for me. and i wasn't really calling you stupid in the literal sense. i was just playing because i knew you would have something to say. so unbunch your panties, mine can take it as you should know by now.

1/21/10   |   Beaze   |   271 respect

haha, your advice earlier ("read a history book") is really good advice.  Just not the ones from school.  The ones that go a lot deeper.

1/21/10   |   Beaze   |   271 respect

Are you seriously trying to compare that discrimination to what Africans, now African Americans went through and still go through in the country?  Not that's it's a popularity contest but please...not even close.

1/21/10   |   kobe_lova   |   59485 respect

(Edited by kobe_lova)

you are so stupid! lol

knowing that other people were discriminated against doesnt make all other discrimination okay. I was so waiting on you to come in here with that mess.

edit: you may disregard. I just read your last post.

1/21/10   |   kantwistaye   |   4201 respect

So the fact that we have a history of discrimination makes it okay? I hope that's not what you meant, because that is just ridiculous.

1/21/10   |   Beaze   |   271 respect

fremontguy26 wrote:
yea white people can say that cause they have never been the minority, until then shut up about being to sensitive jus cause we have a 1/2 black president dont mean that, we should for get the names we were called casue the names still get used today so shut up wit the being sensitive part

You are certainly entitled to your opinion on the matter, but the author, Beaze (me) is not white, mixed or foreign.  All black (or as black as any American can be).  We should never be called out our names, no one should, but that doesn't mean we have to react at the slightest insults.

People regularly call me stupid.  But who cares?  I am a college graduate, with a great job and decent pay.  I don't need to punch the guy out, yell at the top of my lungs or even respond when someone calls me stupid, because I'm not.  Now if I actually was stupid (or at least felt I was stupid) then I would certainly get upset.

The point is, we are not in a position of weakness anymore, where we feel so bad about ourselves that the only thing we have is our "respect" that we must die to protect.  We are more than that now.  I'm just saying, so what if someone uses a juvenile insult.  Would you care if he called you a "doody head?"

1/21/10   |   drn0iswatr   |   731 respect

I think people should cut Greenberg some slack - that guy is not a racist and I think it was an honest mistake. 

1/21/10   |   kobe_lova   |   59485 respect

fremontguy26 wrote:
yea white people can say that cause they have never been the minority, until then shut up about being to sensitive jus cause we have a 1/2 black president dont mean that, we should for get the names we were called casue the names still get used today so shut up wit the being sensitive part

ummm the president is as black as you... and some things are still said in malice and some things aren't as serious as people make them. that is the point. Only a fool believes that racism will end, so unless there is some outright blatant discrimination, black people do need to calm down sometimes. As Cherrie said, sometimes it still hurts and thats understandable, but some people, black people included, are known for blowing things out of proportion. Al Sharpton is a prime example of this. He can find a racist point of view in any situation and sometimes it is totally ridiculous and unneccessary.

1/21/10   |   kobe_lova   |   59485 respect

Beaze wrote:
HAHA, saying "huh" when you heard the person is the mark of a liar.  It's because they are trying to buy time to think up a clever response.

 it's usually the "What?" with the big deer in headlights eyes in my relationships. So i follow that with a quick  "you heard what the f*ck i said, now hurry up and answer me?" good times.

1/21/10   |   fremontguy26   |   24 respect

yea white people can say that cause they have never been the minority, until then shut up about being to sensitive jus cause we have a 1/2 black president dont mean that, we should for get the names we were called casue the names still get used today so shut up wit the being sensitive part

1/21/10   |   Beaze   |   271 respect

kobe_lova wrote:

thats good. because my group of friends in college consisted of 7 white girls from GA and TN and not only did they know nothing of Black History month, they ever even discussed MLK, jr. in american history or anything else. That was crazy to me.


as for the article. #1, i have that failure to communicate with people all of the town because i refuse to spend my whole day yelling at people so all of my words start in a normal tone of voice. People have become accustomed to yelling at one another unintentionally. People also say "huh" when they actually heard you out of habit, so i usually delay repeating myself to see if they can process what i said first. I have to do this alot with my little brother. He says "huh" every time and i ask him what did i say, and he always knows. just a habit.

2. they just think that they can't relate very much.

3. I've always thought that black people make mountains out of molehills. Older people, you have to understand sometimes because they've lived through some sh*t, but others need to just damn calm down and relax.

HAHA, saying "huh" when you heard the person is the mark of a liar.  It's because they are trying to buy time to think up a clever response.

1/21/10   |   Beaze   |   271 respect

kteacher wrote:
Hmmmmmm...if this makes you feel better, I ask all my students how MLK influenced their short lives, and I only have one African American in my classroom.

I'm sure the answer are priceless, lol.

1/21/10   |   kobe_lova   |   59485 respect

kteacher wrote:
Hmmmmmm...if this makes you feel better, I ask all my students how MLK influenced their short lives, and I only have one African American in my classroom.

thats good. because my group of friends in college consisted of 7 white girls from GA and TN and not only did they know nothing of Black History month, they ever even discussed MLK, jr. in american history or anything else. That was crazy to me.


as for the article. #1, i have that failure to communicate with people all of the town because i refuse to spend my whole day yelling at people so all of my words start in a normal tone of voice. People have become accustomed to yelling at one another unintentionally. People also say "huh" when they actually heard you out of habit, so i usually delay repeating myself to see if they can process what i said first. I have to do this alot with my little brother. He says "huh" every time and i ask him what did i say, and he always knows. just a habit.

2. they just think that they can't relate very much.

3. I've always thought that black people make mountains out of molehills. Older people, you have to understand sometimes because they've lived through some sh*t, but others need to just damn calm down and relax.

1/21/10   |   kteacher   |   33985 respect

Hmmmmmm...if this makes you feel better, I ask all my students how MLK influenced their short lives, and I only have one African American in my classroom.