NBA

Two Kids Putting Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 Hour Rule to the Test

1/17/13 in NBA   |   aaronjchung   |   264 respect

 Blog Photo - Two Kids Putting Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 Hour Rule to the Test

In Malcolm Gladwell’s famous book, “Outliers,” he frequently talks about how success is based upon the “10,000-Hour Rule.”  According to Gladwell’s theory, for someone to be successful at something they need to practice that specific task for at least 10,000 hours.
 
Two undersized kids from the Bay Area recently decided to put that theory to the test in regards to basketball.  Both kids are under 6 feet tall, but have aspirations of playing basketball at the highest level.  So, they decide to put in 10,000 hours of practice to see if they can really become successful with a career in basketball.
 
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1/17/13   |   Trokspot   |   61 respect

orangemen90 wrote:
So if i work at my job for 5 years (5 time 2080 hours).. I will be good at my job... thats not a correct analogy....sociology does not always work.. this is one example...

I think you missed the point.

1/17/13   |   orangemen90   |   5785 respect

So if i work at my job for 5 years (5 time 2080 hours).. I will be good at my job... thats not a correct analogy....sociology does not always work.. this is one example...

1/17/13   |   Trokspot   |   61 respect

Hi book is a great read - I use it to teach in my sociology courses (including the sociology of sport class I teach).  But be careful (or these kids maybe need to be careful) not to misread or misunderstand what he is saying. 

He doesn't say that anyone who puts in 10,000 hours of work will become excellent and a pro ("an outlier").  10,000 hours is a certain threshold that he says is sort of the benchmark to hit, but there are other thresholds and external factors as well.  One of which he particularly points out (in the case of basketball) is height - he says that the 10,000 hour rule can be applied once you are a certain height, have a certain degree of ahtleticism, etc.  There are also other sort of random opportunistic advantages or things that generally need to fall into place for one to become an outlier.

He does the same thing with IQ.  Once you reach a certain threshold of IQ (a standard deviation or so above the average), then it's those who put in 10,000 hours, have good educational opportunities, good family support systems, etc. that appear to rise to the top.

1/17/13   |   huskerdoug2009   |   2745 respect

I wish them both good luck.