Warren Sapp accused of stiffing a waitress on tip while watching USA vs. Belgium World Cup game

Did Warren Sapp stiff his waitress while watching the USA-Belgium game?

7/2/14 in NFL   |   Pat   |   5233 respect

According to ESPN's Darren Rovell, a restaurant server says that Warren Sapp came into their establishment to watch the USA-Belgium World Cup game, and stiffed her on the tip on a $69 check.
 
Blog Photo - Warren Sapp accused of stiffing a waitress on tip while watching USA vs. Belgium World Cup game

According to this, Sapp watched the game at the Upper Deck Sports Bar and Grill in Hallandale, Florida, and wrote "Boys don't tip" on the check.

If true, this is a classless move by someone who has quite frankly proven himself over the years to lack class. It comes as no surprise.
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7/7/14   |   Debi_L   |   11868 respect

Debi_L wrote:
My kids were taught the same, to use Mr. or Mrs. or Miss whatever, or Auntie or Uncle - they two had a lot of aunts and uncles.  

And I use "Dude" all the time as well.  Matter of fact, I used it about 20 times today at work.

Exactly!!

7/6/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

Debi_L wrote:
My kids were taught the same, to use Mr. or Mrs. or Miss whatever, or Auntie or Uncle - they two had a lot of aunts and uncles.  

And I use "Dude" all the time as well.  Matter of fact, I used it about 20 times today at work.

I'm personally not fond of being called "Mrs. Haman" - I'd rather be called "Ms. Jess". The "Mrs." feels almost like a "Mr's" proprietary thing and however silly or unfounded/uneducated that may seem, it irks me...I know it's crazy, but I can't help it. We have friends whose kids try to call me Mrs. Haman...I tell them "no, I don't care what your parents have told you. Please just call me Jess or Ms. Jess if you must."

7/5/14   |   Debi_L   |   11868 respect

Jess wrote:
I'd rather be called "miss" than "ma'am"...Ma'am makes me feel old. I do the same thing with Kiernan as far as Mr. and Ms. go...but it's usually first name. Like she might call you Ms. Jen (unless she called you "aunt jen" - she has a lot of "aunts" and "uncles")

I call people dude ALL. THE. TIME. I haven't even tried to quit. 

My kids were taught the same, to use Mr. or Mrs. or Miss whatever, or Auntie or Uncle - they two had a lot of aunts and uncles.  

And I use "Dude" all the time as well.  Matter of fact, I used it about 20 times today at work.

7/5/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

JenX63 wrote:
It took me 3 years and sometimes I still slip and call someone "dude". I personally don't like being called "maam" or "miss", but that's just me. I, like Debi feel ancient when someone does it. I also understand though that most of the time it is just the other person being polite. I do make the boys call someone Mr or Miss and then their name. I like them to have manners even if I do not.

I'd rather be called "miss" than "ma'am"...Ma'am makes me feel old. I do the same thing with Kiernan as far as Mr. and Ms. go...but it's usually first name. Like she might call you Ms. Jen (unless she called you "aunt jen" - she has a lot of "aunts" and "uncles")

I call people dude ALL. THE. TIME. I haven't even tried to quit. 

7/5/14   |   JenX63   |   32903 respect

Jess wrote:
It's so funny how different regions are with "Sir" and "Ma'am". Since my husband came home from boot camp, every stranger is "Sir" or "Ma'am" to him. I noticed when we lived in Florida and even traveling across the country a few times, people just seem to either appreciate it or think nothing of it, as if it's just expected. However, in the northwest here if it's a person who's not much older than him, or maybe not in the military (there, it's expected of course), he gets the oddest looks - almost like they're offended or just weirded out by him calling them that. Older gentlemen and ladies seem to really like it and comment on what a nice polite young fella he is, but anyone remotely younger is like, "the hell you just call me?" It's fun watching different reactions to something like that.

It took me 3 years and sometimes I still slip and call someone "dude". I personally don't like being called "maam" or "miss", but that's just me. I, like Debi feel ancient when someone does it. I also understand though that most of the time it is just the other person being polite. I do make the boys call someone Mr or Miss and then their name. I like them to have manners even if I do not.

7/5/14   |   Debi_L   |   11868 respect

If she said "boy" in a derogatory manner, he would have written "this boy don't tip", I'm thinking.  He wrote "boys don't tip" and my gut feeling is that she simply called them boys, but as y'all have said without that fly on the wall vision, we will never know.  I still think he's a jerk.

I hate being called Ma'am, always have.  Makes me feel ancient.

As a teen I volunteered at a home for Mentally Handicapped people.  Back then they were called Mentally Retarded, with no thought for correctness.  I personally will not ever and have not ever used the term "retard".  To me it is like using the C word.  I just will not.  I understand completely that other people do, and I don't judge them or ridicule them for that use, as long as it isn't used toward another person in a derogatory manner.  After what I witnessed in that institution, I simply cannot.

7/4/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

It's so funny how different regions are with "Sir" and "Ma'am". Since my husband came home from boot camp, every stranger is "Sir" or "Ma'am" to him. I noticed when we lived in Florida and even traveling across the country a few times, people just seem to either appreciate it or think nothing of it, as if it's just expected. However, in the northwest here if it's a person who's not much older than him, or maybe not in the military (there, it's expected of course), he gets the oddest looks - almost like they're offended or just weirded out by him calling them that. Older gentlemen and ladies seem to really like it and comment on what a nice polite young fella he is, but anyone remotely younger is like, "the hell you just call me?" It's fun watching different reactions to something like that.

7/3/14   |   HouTxFan   |   5218 respect

JenX63 wrote:
 I am wondering if this isn't just a case of "bruised ego"? She wasn't falling all over herself cause she was waiting on a "celebrity"? On the other hand, this shiotz still goes on and maybe it was her little "dig". I honestly don't know and not being the fly on the wall makes it hard to make a clear cut choice. I did happen to speak to my cousin down in Florida and he {coming from Los Angeles, where supposedly we all are rude} said he has never had a problem with service or being called a "boy(s) when out.
Oh Ms Jan, you would surely be puttng the hot sauce in my mouth. I am always referring to myself as a "tard". Sisters started it all when I was 6 and they still call me the "bratty tard" when I piss them off. I do understand folks dislike of the word and try to keep it to a minimum.
As a transplant living in Texas, I do know very well how "BIG" they are on Sir/Maam. I don't think I would last a day as a waitress here.

"...how 'BIG' they are on Sir/Maam."      Heh...I got 2 spankings as a kid, and the first one was because of being impolite in front of a neighbor. You can bet your sweet bippy I've been a Yes Maam-ing/No Sir-ing fool ever since then!   angel  

7/3/14   |   HouTxFan   |   5218 respect

JenX63 wrote:
 I am wondering if this isn't just a case of "bruised ego"? She wasn't falling all over herself cause she was waiting on a "celebrity"? On the other hand, this shiotz still goes on and maybe it was her little "dig". I honestly don't know and not being the fly on the wall makes it hard to make a clear cut choice. I did happen to speak to my cousin down in Florida and he {coming from Los Angeles, where supposedly we all are rude} said he has never had a problem with service or being called a "boy(s) when out.
Oh Ms Jan, you would surely be puttng the hot sauce in my mouth. I am always referring to myself as a "tard". Sisters started it all when I was 6 and they still call me the "bratty tard" when I piss them off. I do understand folks dislike of the word and try to keep it to a minimum.
As a transplant living in Texas, I do know very well how "BIG" they are on Sir/Maam. I don't think I would last a day as a waitress here.

Nope, no hot sauce for you or Jess! heart Like I said, my sisters use it, and we're tight. They were both kinda surprised when I expressed my feelings about it recently. It's when it is used in a derogatory manner, which that woman definitely was doing, that I get so upset. (She sure could have used some "sweetness" lessons from my cousin...there wasn't a mean bone in her body.)  I befriended some of the kids in the "special ed" classes way, way back when, and my classmates used to look at me like I was nuts if they saw me talking to them in the hallway.  As for me, I just try to avoid using the word, but I wouldn't presume to make everyone else do the same. 

7/3/14   |   JenX63   |   32903 respect

 I am wondering if this isn't just a case of "bruised ego"? She wasn't falling all over herself cause she was waiting on a "celebrity"? On the other hand, this shiotz still goes on and maybe it was her little "dig". I honestly don't know and not being the fly on the wall makes it hard to make a clear cut choice. I did happen to speak to my cousin down in Florida and he {coming from Los Angeles, where supposedly we all are rude} said he has never had a problem with service or being called a "boy(s) when out.
Oh Ms Jan, you would surely be puttng the hot sauce in my mouth. I am always referring to myself as a "tard". Sisters started it all when I was 6 and they still call me the "bratty tard" when I piss them off. I do understand folks dislike of the word and try to keep it to a minimum.
As a transplant living in Texas, I do know very well how "BIG" they are on Sir/Maam. I don't think I would last a day as a waitress here.

7/3/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

HouTxFan wrote:
We've had a "family debate" about using the word just recently - some members do, and some don't, both of my sisters do. We had a cousin who was very special to me...she's no longer living, but was quite possibly the sweetest person I've ever known. I will still 'mimic' some of her cuter phrases, like calling my mother "muddah", saying "tata" for thank you, and referring to myself as "Janny Root" (Janice Ruth-she called all of us cousins, including herself, by both of our given names-it was so cute), but I chose to avoid saying things like "I feel like such a retard", etc.  As for the 'mimicing', it is done in a loving manner that is acceptable to my aunt. Barbie was definitely the favorite of the entire family, but she and I had a special bond, which was kind of funny, since she was the oldest cousin and I'm the youngest. 

"Virtually" knowing you, and the way you describe your usage of the word, it would not offend me. Part of what got to me is that woman had no idea who she was speaking to, and continued using the word after I told her I didn't appreciate it. I expected her to call right back and complain about me.  Since she didn't, maybe it affected her in some small way, and she'll lighten up in the future. 

I sure hope so!

7/3/14   |   HouTxFan   |   5218 respect

Jess wrote:
I'm so sorry you had to deal with such a nasty woman. Wow, how awful.

I have to admit to using that word in many cases; none of which I would actually tell someone they were being "retarded" and actually, none of which I would be referring to anyone mentally challenged. I'm not trying to justify my use of the word and especially not trying to say it was okay for her to do so; your post just made me think.

You're right. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the waitress had harmlessly referred to the group  as "boys" rather than gentlemen, but she may have referred to him as "boy". In any case, we'll never know the exact situation as it transpired. I shouldn't judge. (But he does seem like a jerk, either way.)

We've had a "family debate" about using the word just recently - some members do, and some don't, both of my sisters do. We had a cousin who was very special to me...she's no longer living, but was quite possibly the sweetest person I've ever known. I will still 'mimic' some of her cuter phrases, like calling my mother "muddah", saying "tata" for thank you, and referring to myself as "Janny Root" (Janice Ruth-she called all of us cousins, including herself, by both of our given names-it was so cute), but I chose to avoid saying things like "I feel like such a retard", etc.  As for the 'mimicing', it is done in a loving manner that is acceptable to my aunt. Barbie was definitely the favorite of the entire family, but she and I had a special bond, which was kind of funny, since she was the oldest cousin and I'm the youngest. 

"Virtually" knowing you, and the way you describe your usage of the word, it would not offend me. Part of what got to me is that woman had no idea who she was speaking to, and continued using the word after I told her I didn't appreciate it. I expected her to call right back and complain about me.  Since she didn't, maybe it affected her in some small way, and she'll lighten up in the future. 

7/3/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

HouTxFan wrote:
"She crab soup" = no crab balls?   cheeky

I agree w/ your boss, Jen. Had a young lady about half my age (or less) call me "honey" the other day, and I have to say I just didn't like it. She was wonderful in every other way, and it wasn't anything I would've complained over anyway. It did "get under my skin" a little, though, especially since she had my name on the paperwork in front of her.

Because I'm from Texas, which has a bit of a...ahem...reputation from times gone by, I try to be careful when using 'boy'. I work in a local gov't office, and I frequently wait on folks who walk in together to pull a building permit or take care of a traffic ticket. If I'm waiting on multiple men who are around my age, I may go w/ Debi's "What can I do for you boys?" as I approach the counter.  If they are a good bit younger than me, I take a different track, and say something like "What can I do for you gentlemen?"  I figure it might make the older guys feel a little younger, and it lets the younger guys know that they have my respect.

Had a woman on the phone the other morning who was complaining about the way the city handled notifying people of a temporary disruption in water service. (We all know this witch and dread seeing her name on Caller ID.) When I told her we didn't find out until very late the afternoon before, so all we could do was put a notice on our web site, she told me that was "retarded". I despise using that word in that manner, but held my tongue. She kept after me, saying "Y'all have got to be retarded if you think that people are going to check the web site."  I told her 1) there was nothing else we could do at the end of the day, 2) suggested she check the web site in the future, and 3) I did not appreciate being spoken to that way. She told me I was retarded if I thought she was going to check any damn website. As politely as I could manage at that point, I said "I am highly offended now, and I'll be hanging up the phone." I promptly reported myself to my boss for hanging up on someone, but also told her I wan't going to allow anybody to speak to me that way. [Not sure what any of that has to do w/ Warren Sapp, but I feel better now. I'm still po'd about the whole thing, and hope I don't have to talk to her again any time soon!]   angry

Warren Sapp seems to be a Class A jerk, but this is probably one of those cases where we'll never know what really happened.
    

 

I'm so sorry you had to deal with such a nasty woman. Wow, how awful.

I have to admit to using that word in many cases; none of which I would actually tell someone they were being "retarded" and actually, none of which I would be referring to anyone mentally challenged. I'm not trying to justify my use of the word and especially not trying to say it was okay for her to do so; your post just made me think.

You're right. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the waitress had harmlessly referred to the group  as "boys" rather than gentlemen, but she may have referred to him as "boy". In any case, we'll never know the exact situation as it transpired. I shouldn't judge. (But he does seem like a jerk, either way.)

7/3/14   |   HouTxFan   |   5218 respect

JenX63 wrote:
"She crab soup" what is that?

and Debi,  when I waitressed, my customers got called just about everything, except "honey", the boss didn't feel it was appropriate.
Sounds like he was in a bad mood. But, if he really was that offended, why didn't he say something to her? the manager? smh, people are crazy

"She crab soup" = no crab balls?   cheeky

I agree w/ your boss, Jen. Had a young lady about half my age (or less) call me "honey" the other day, and I have to say I just didn't like it. She was wonderful in every other way, and it wasn't anything I would've complained over anyway. It did "get under my skin" a little, though, especially since she had my name on the paperwork in front of her.

Because I'm from Texas, which has a bit of a...ahem...reputation from times gone by, I try to be careful when using 'boy'. I work in a local gov't office, and I frequently wait on folks who walk in together to pull a building permit or take care of a traffic ticket. If I'm waiting on multiple men who are around my age, I may go w/ Debi's "What can I do for you boys?" as I approach the counter.  If they are a good bit younger than me, I take a different track, and say something like "What can I do for you gentlemen?"  I figure it might make the older guys feel a little younger, and it lets the younger guys know that they have my respect.

Had a woman on the phone the other morning who was complaining about the way the city handled notifying people of a temporary disruption in water service. (We all know this witch and dread seeing her name on Caller ID.) When I told her we didn't find out until very late the afternoon before, so all we could do was put a notice on our web site, she told me that was "retarded". I despise using that word in that manner, but held my tongue. She kept after me, saying "Y'all have got to be retarded if you think that people are going to check the web site."  I told her 1) there was nothing else we could do at the end of the day, 2) suggested she check the web site in the future, and 3) I did not appreciate being spoken to that way. She told me I was retarded if I thought she was going to check any damn website. As politely as I could manage at that point, I said "I am highly offended now, and I'll be hanging up the phone." I promptly reported myself to my boss for hanging up on someone, but also told her I wan't going to allow anybody to speak to me that way. [Not sure what any of that has to do w/ Warren Sapp, but I feel better now. I'm still po'd about the whole thing, and hope I don't have to talk to her again any time soon!]   angry

Warren Sapp seems to be a Class A jerk, but this is probably one of those cases where we'll never know what really happened.
    

 

7/3/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

Debi_L wrote:
One of the comments I read asked how did she use the term "boy(s)"?  If it was as I suggested "What can I get you boys?" then he has absolutely no grounds.  If, however, she referred to him as "boy" in a derogatory manner, he may have had the right to be offended.  HOWEVER, as both of you have said, there are other ways to deal with this - manager, supervisor, hell, even talk to the waitress yourself and tell her it was offensive.  Cheap bastard.

Oh I can totally see how he'd be offended if she called him "boy" in a derogatory manner...I hadn't even thought of that. Hmm...I wonder what actually happened.

7/3/14   |   scottmike21   |   3 respect

No class. That's all I can think of to say. 

7/2/14   |   Debi_L   |   11868 respect

One of the comments I read asked how did she use the term "boy(s)"?  If it was as I suggested "What can I get you boys?" then he has absolutely no grounds.  If, however, she referred to him as "boy" in a derogatory manner, he may have had the right to be offended.  HOWEVER, as both of you have said, there are other ways to deal with this - manager, supervisor, hell, even talk to the waitress yourself and tell her it was offensive.  Cheap bastard.

7/2/14   |   Jess   |   34926 respect

I'm not surprised, but who the hell does he think he is? If the wait staff sucked and didn't deserve a tip, that's one thing...but to give an excuse like that? Please. You went into an establishment and were provided a service. I may tend to over-tip for even mediocre service, but as someone whose mother worked in the industry I can't help it. 

But seriously...he was offended by "boys"? Please. I agree with Jen - why didn't he say something if it was offensive? It's not like she was calling him something blatantly inappropriate that it should be obvious it was offensive. 

I don't know why, but this really grinds my gears. And I'm *sure* Warren Sapp is not an easy person to wait on.

7/2/14   |   JenX63   |   32903 respect

"She crab soup" what is that?

and Debi,  when I waitressed, my customers got called just about everything, except "honey", the boss didn't feel it was appropriate.
Sounds like he was in a bad mood. But, if he really was that offended, why didn't he say something to her? the manager? smh, people are crazy

7/2/14   |   Debi_L   |   11868 respect

He was apparently offended by the waitress calling he and his associates "boys", hence the "Boys don't tip" comment on the bill.  

So, I'm a waitress at the golf course.  I CONSTANTLY refer to the customers, many of whom are grown ass men, of every color in the book, as boys.

"What can I get you boys?"

 I have never had anyone take offence to that question, or at least no one has ever indicated they were offended.  Honestly, it never occurred to me that it was offensive, until just now when I read this story.  I guess I have to rethink how I work.