What Robinson Cano's departure means for the Yankees

Cano Leaving is a Disaster for the Yankees

12/6/13 in MLB   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

Jul 24, 2013; Arlington, TX, USA; New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano (24) laughs during the game against the Texas Rangers at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington.  Texas won 3-1. Mandatory Credit: Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY SportsHad they re-signed Cano, the reaction would be the exact opposite of what it is today. They’d complain about the money, but qualifications would accompany their relief that they don’t have to worry about second base and the middle of their lineup because they had the production of Cano to count on for the near future. Now that he’s leaving, his lack of hustle is a problem. It’s said that he’s not a leader. He’s called a great player, but not a person who puts fans in the seats. Rather than caveats to explain away Cano’s faults, it’s caveat emptor for the Mariners.
 
Now the Yankees are supposed to spread the money out and get players who fit more into a team concept than the individual who puts up massive numbers. This reverts to the players who did imperative things that the unsung cogs in the machine from the late 1990s – Scott Brosius, Darryl Strawberry, Chili Davis, Joe Girardi – did to augment the stars that were integral to them winning. It’s an insult to Cano and a denigration of his skills to dismiss him and say that he wasn’t that great anyway and they only won one title with him as if that’s his fault. It’s as if he’s the one responsible for their inability to repeat their success from the 1990s and they’re glad he’s gone.
 
If Cano leaving proves anything it’s that the idea of players signing with or staying with the Yankees has nothing to do with the “rich tapestry of history” that the storyline promotes. It has to do with money. One of the most popular memes going back 100 years is that everyone wants to be a Yankee. Before the draft was implemented, players signed with the Yankees because they won every year and they offered the most money. Once the draft was created, the Yankees struggled because they were unable to adapt to the new landscape in which they couldn’t simply buy amateur players. It took free agency for them to truly be able to regain their footing as they dove in with an open checkbook and signed Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson and Goose Gossage among others. There were some cases in which players chose to play elsewhere in spite of the money Steinbrenner threw around. Rod Carew didn’t want to go to New York. John Denny didn’t like the atmosphere and perception of disarray. Greg Maddux didn’t want to be the center of attention and didn't like New York. It’s happened, but not often. Some of the more popular stories of players joining the Yankees follow with the whispered epilogue superseding the vast money that few want to acknowledge as the real reason:
 
  • Torre called Mike Mussina to express how much the Yankees wanted him (and the Yankees offered him $87 million).
  • Bernie Williams called George Steinbrenner as he and Scott Boras were about to go to Boston to sign with the Red Sox (and the Yankees upped their initial offer by about $30 million to nearly match the Red Sox offer).
  • Derek Jeter signed a long-term extension to shun free agency (for $189 million).
  • Alex Rodriguez signed a contract to stay (for $275 million).
  • Roger Clemens returned after one of his frequent retirements and three years with the Astros (for a prorated $28 million).
 
For the most part, the Yankees get the players because they pay for them. Another team paid Cano far more than the Yankees were willing to and he left.
 
Cano signing with the Mariners for ten years and $240 million is a disaster for the Yankees. Don’t let it be framed any differently than that. They have a lot of work to do. No matter how it’s twisted to suit the Yankees and their fans to explain away a need to adapt, losing the best second baseman in baseball is never a good thing. He’s almost impossible to replace and there are limited options to do it. Don’t believe the sources explaining away the Yankees allowing Cano to leave. It’s damage control. There was lot of damage to control before Cano left. If they hope to still be perceived as the Yankees of old, they have to fix it. Losing Cano is a bad start.
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12/12/13   |   PAULLEBOWITZ   |   109 respect

autmorsautlibertas wrote:
It sucks to lose Cano, but his contact demands were simply outrageous and I am glad that they did not allow themselves to be manipulated.
I don't think that Cano will be very happy in Seattle.  JayZ and the fellas won't be there after the game to pal around with.  We will also see how playing in an enormous stadium will have on his power numbers, and how playing in front of about half the Yankee daily attendance will have on his game.  He better get used to sitting out of the playoffs. 

The Yankees better have a real plan to replace him that's better than slamming him and spending money. 
And I agree. He'll be miserable playing there. Really wealthy, though.

12/7/13   |   autmorsautlibertas   |   1 respect

It sucks to lose Cano, but his contact demands were simply outrageous and I am glad that they did not allow themselves to be manipulated.
I don't think that Cano will be very happy in Seattle.  JayZ and the fellas won't be there after the game to pal around with.  We will also see how playing in an enormous stadium will have on his power numbers, and how playing in front of about half the Yankee daily attendance will have on his game.  He better get used to sitting out of the playoffs.