Asked by: irmacourt (+)
Answers Created: 236
San Francisco 49ers



Last Answer: KSbengals99 (+)
Answers: 5938
Cincinnati Bengals




« Locker Room Polls
12
LETS MAKE THIS POEM THE FANS POEM TO FANIQ PLEASE ?
I LEFT THE POEM OPEN SO WHO EVER WHATS TO PUT THEIR OWN ENDING TO IT CAN CHEER HAVE FUN ! 
FOR ALL FANS
 
WE ARE THE BEST FANS AROUND 
 
WHEN FANIQ FANS CHEER 
WE CHEER FROM THE HEART
A LOUD SHOUT THEY'LL HEAR
ALL FANS DOING THERE PART 
 
ON EVERY GAME DAY
EVERYONE WILL HEAR
ON THAT SPECTACULAR DAY
EVERY FANIQ'S CHEER
 
SO LETS MAKE A LOUD SOUND 
CHEERING AS LOUD AS WE CAN
TO BE HEARD THE WORLD AROUND 
CHEER AND TAKE YOUR STAND................
 
 
NOW YOU ALL FINISH THIS POEM LETS MAKE THIS POEM THE FANS POEM TO FANIQ PLEASE 
LETS SHOW THEM HOW WE APPRECIATE THEM FOR LETTING US CHEER IN HERE I STARTED IT AND  YOU ALL CAN FINISH IT IF YOU WANT TOO BUT BE NICE ABOUT IT AND  PLEASE KEEP IT RESPECTFUL TOO AL YOU GOTTA DO IS COPY N PASTE AND THEN ADD YOUR OWN CHEER TO THE END OF IT .....  IF YOU LIKE ... BUT KEEP THE MAIN POEM INTACT PLEASE ... HAVE FUN 
THANK YOU 
 
 
BY IRMA
FanIQ Pts? No | Locker Room | Closes 735738 days | Multiple Choice Opinion Poll

Tagged as:   FanIQ Poem
YES I WILL PUT IN MY CHEER......
NO ITS FINE THE WAY IT IS......
I FEEL POETIC......
TOO SHY.....
I CHEER MY WAY....
IT NEEDS WORK...
YA RIGHT...
STAND ON THE 5TH.....
I DONT WANNA PLAY.....
I CHEER LOUD.....
I CHEER PROUD.....
I CHEER HAPPY.....
I CHEER SAPPY.....
I CHEER FUNNY.....
I CHEER WHILE RUNNING.....
I CHEER FROM MY HEART.....
I CHEER EVERYTHING.....
I CHEER SOME THINGS.....
I CHEER SOME THINGS JUST NOT POEMS
I CHEER JUST TO CHEER.....
12

(Caution -- you will be unable to change your answer.)


 &nbp;
TOP COMMENT * * * * * * * * * * * *
#12 | 764 days ago
John_Daly (+)

Burrellfan1 wrote:
I do not like cheering for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I won't cheer for them with a fox. I won't cheer for them wearing socks.
I won't cheer for them in my house.  I won't cheer for them while catching a mouse.
I won't cheer for them on my grounds.  I won't cheer for them eating a Mounds.
I won't cheer for them wearing hats.  I won't cheer for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
It annoys me and makes me think of beans.
Whats the point of doing that?
Is it to get a bunch of faniq points?, seems kinda whack.
Ohh, I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
This poem sucks but its not what it seems.
Cheer for faniq. Cheer louder than any other fan site thats out there.
  
103 Comments | Sorted by Most Recent First | Red = You Disagreed
Vote for your favorite comments. Fans decide the Top Comment (3+ votes) and also hide poor quality comments (4+ votes).
#1 | 764 days ago

I'll be back to do this when I'm in a better frame of mind. If I do it right now it may sound a little like Dr. Suess.....
Enter the poll to see my answer
#2 | 764 days ago

I DID MY PART FIRST  LOL ENJOY
Enter the poll to see my answer
#3 | 764 days ago

DallasFan55 wrote:
I'll be back to do this when I'm in a better frame of mind. If I do it right now it may sound a little like Dr. Suess.....
COOL WHEN EVER YOU WANT TO SIS LOVE YA 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#4 | 764 days ago

Is this a repeat poll?
#5 | 764 days ago

I do not like cheering for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I won't cheer for them with a fox. I won't cheer for them wearing socks.
I won't cheer for them in my house.  I won't cheer for them while catching a mouse.
I won't cheer for them on my grounds.  I won't cheer for them eating a Mounds.
I won't cheer for them wearing hats.  I won't cheer for the Kentucky Wildcats.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#6 | 764 days ago

I dont get it.
#7 | 764 days ago

I don't want to be a bearer of bad news but Kentucky won in a run away
Enter the poll to see my answer
#8 | 764 days ago

"their part."
#9 | 764 days ago

Cali_Kat wrote:
Is this a repeat poll?
NO...LOL.....THIS IS ONE WHERE YOU GET TO MAKE YOUR OWN ENDING FOR THE POEM I WROTE
Enter the poll to see my answer
#10 | 764 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
I dont get it.
I LEFT THE POEM OPEN SO WHO EVER WHATS TO PUT THEIR OWN ENDING LIKE BURRELLFAN 1 DID MAKE YOUR OWN AND PUT YOUR OWN ENDING CHEER  HAVE FUN WITH IT OK
I do not like cheering for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I won't cheer for them with a fox. I won't cheer for them wearing socks.
I won't cheer for them in my house.  I won't cheer for them while catching a mouse.
I won't cheer for them on my grounds.  I won't cheer for them eating a Mounds.
I won't cheer for them wearing hats.  I won't cheer for the Kentucky Wildcats.
NO ITS FINE THE WAY IT IS......  
Enter the poll to see my answer
#11 | 764 days ago

Burrellfan1 wrote:
I do not like cheering for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I won't cheer for them with a fox. I won't cheer for them wearing socks.
I won't cheer for them in my house.  I won't cheer for them while catching a mouse.
I won't cheer for them on my grounds.  I won't cheer for them eating a Mounds.
I won't cheer for them wearing hats.  I won't cheer for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I LIKE IT ITS COOL I LIKE HOW YOU DID THAT 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#12 | 764 days ago
John_Daly (+)

Burrellfan1 wrote:
I do not like cheering for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I won't cheer for them with a fox. I won't cheer for them wearing socks.
I won't cheer for them in my house.  I won't cheer for them while catching a mouse.
I won't cheer for them on my grounds.  I won't cheer for them eating a Mounds.
I won't cheer for them wearing hats.  I won't cheer for the Kentucky Wildcats.
I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
It annoys me and makes me think of beans.
Whats the point of doing that?
Is it to get a bunch of faniq points?, seems kinda whack.
Ohh, I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
This poem sucks but its not what it seems.
Cheer for faniq. Cheer louder than any other fan site thats out there.
#13 | 763 days ago

I cant concentrate when people scream at me.
#14 | 763 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
It annoys me and makes me think of beans.
Whats the point of doing that?
Is it to get a bunch of faniq points?, seems kinda whack.
Ohh, I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
This poem sucks but its not what it seems.
Cheer for faniq. Cheer louder than any other fan site thats out there.
Was this suppose to rhyme?
You may need some of my teach time.
Good try, 
Next time, with my help, your rhyme will be more fly.


yes
Enter the poll to see my answer
#15 | 763 days ago
John_Daly (+)

kteacher wrote:
Was this suppose to rhyme?
You may need some of my teach time.
Good try, 
Next time, with my help, your rhyme will be more fly.


yes
Some of it rhymed. If I need some help i'll drop a dime.
#16 | 763 days ago

Word to the wise, friend. 
Always wipe front to back please.
Poo crotch is not good.


HAIKU NINJA!
#17 | 763 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
Some of it rhymed. If I need some help i'll drop a dime.
You are right! 
Two of your lines were indeed quite alright. 
Well done!
It better not be your last one.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#18 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
I cant concentrate when people scream at me.
I DON'T SCREAM JASON READ MY PROFILE PIC I TYPE IN CAPS SO I CAN READ  THE BOOK OF NETIQUETTE SAIS
'IF YOU SUDDENLY TYPE IN CAPS LIKE TYPING IN ALL LOWER CASE LETTERS THEN TYPE A WORD OR SENTENCE OUT OF THE NORMAL LOWER CASE LETTERS SUDDENLY CAN BE CONSIDERED YELLING,'  BUT SWEETY  I CONSTANTLY TYPE IN CAPS  SO I AM NOT SCREAMING 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#19 | 763 days ago

kteacher wrote:
Was this suppose to rhyme?
You may need some of my teach time.
Good try, 
Next time, with my help, your rhyme will be more fly.


yes
NOT ALL POEMS RHYME THERE ARE SEVERAL WELL KNOWN AUTHERS WHO DON'T RHYME ALL THE TIME LIKE EDGER ALLEN POE AND OTHERS.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#20 | 763 days ago

I LEFT THE POEM OPEN SO WHO EVER WHATS TO PUT THEIR OWN ENDING TO IT CAN CHEER HAVE FUN ! 
FOR ALL FANS
 
WE ARE THE BEST FANS AROUND 
 
WHEN FANIQ FANS CHEER 
WE CHEER FROM THE HEART
A LOUD SHOUT THEY'LL HEAR
ALL FANS DOING THERE PART 
 
ON EVERY GAME DAY
EVERYONE WILL HEAR
ON THAT SPECTACULAR DAY
EVERY FANIQ'S CHEER
 
SO LETS MAKE A LOUD SOUND 
CHEERING AS LOUD AS WE CAN
TO BE HEARD THE WORLD AROUND 
CHEER AND TAKE YOUR STAND................

AND CHEERS ARE HEARD IN EVERY LAND
AS THE FANIQ FANS JUMP IN THEIR STANDS
SO CHEER FROM YOUR VERY SOUL,
FOR FANIQ CHEERS ARE WELL KNOWN 





THIS IS WHAT I WAS TALKING ABOUT PPL
 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#21 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
Word to the wise, friend. 
Always wipe front to back please.
Poo crotch is not good.


HAIKU NINJA!
stooopid.


and lol at post 18. **
Enter the poll to see my answer
#22 | 763 days ago

kobe_lova wrote:
stooopid.


and lol at post 18. **
LOL! Figures he would write it!
#23 | 763 days ago

So you only get to read what YOU type unless we post in all caps back?  So im guessing the only word you can read out of this whole post is "you" from my previous sentence.   And im assuming that its very confusing for you to see blurryblurryblurryblurryYOUblurryblurryblurryblurry.  I apologize.   Wait..you couldnt see that...I APOLOGIZE.
#24 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
So you only get to read what YOU type unless we post in all caps back?  So im guessing the only word you can read out of this whole post is "you" from my previous sentence.   And im assuming that its very confusing for you to see blurryblurryblurryblurryYOUblurryblurryblurryblurry.  I apologize.   Wait..you couldnt see that...I APOLOGIZE.
Sweet lord, I hate you....
Enter the poll to see my answer
#25 | 763 days ago

(Edited by Nick__)
irmacourt wrote:
I DON'T SCREAM JASON READ MY PROFILE PIC I TYPE IN CAPS SO I CAN READ  THE BOOK OF NETIQUETTE SAIS
'IF YOU SUDDENLY TYPE IN CAPS LIKE TYPING IN ALL LOWER CASE LETTERS THEN TYPE A WORD OR SENTENCE OUT OF THE NORMAL LOWER CASE LETTERS SUDDENLY CAN BE CONSIDERED YELLING,'  BUT SWEETY  I CONSTANTLY TYPE IN CAPS  SO I AM NOT SCREAMING 
I have an excuse
This isn't abuse



smiley   and it rhymed....I'm a poet and didn't know it!  surprise
#26 | 763 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
NOT ALL POEMS RHYME THERE ARE SEVERAL WELL KNOWN AUTHERS WHO DON'T RHYME ALL THE TIME LIKE EDGER ALLEN POE AND OTHERS.
True
but I was thinking Mr. Daly wasn't one of those great few
And thought  that he probably meant to rhyme
yet didn't put in the time
to do it correct

Sorry if my words aren't erect.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#27 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
So you only get to read what YOU type unless we post in all caps back?  So im guessing the only word you can read out of this whole post is "you" from my previous sentence.   And im assuming that its very confusing for you to see blurryblurryblurryblurryYOUblurryblurryblurryblurry.  I apologize.   Wait..you couldnt see that...I APOLOGIZE.
I GUESS YOU DON'T KNOW HOW PAINFUL IT IS TO BE 6 INCHES FROM YOUR SCREEN AND TRY TO TYPE CRUNCHED UP AND READ WHAT JERKS LIKE YOU DONT UNDERSTAND HERE TRY THIS SITE OUT SWEETY ITS REAL BTW COPY PASTE WORKS REAL GOOD TO HELP WITH ADOBE READER PROGRAMS  SO I CAN SEE WHAT PPL LIKE YOU HAVE TO SAY ITS SAD REALLY YOU NEED TO READ THIS BOOK DEAR 
 WHAT IS NETIQUETTE ?
What is Netiquette?
 Introduction
 
by Virginia Shea
 

What is Netiquette? Simply stated, it's network etiquette -- that is, the etiquette of cyberspace. And "etiquette" means "the forms required by good breeding or prescribed by authority to be required in social or official life." In other words, Netiquette is a set of rules for behaving properly online.
 
When you enter any new culture -- and cyberspace has its own culture -- you're liable to commit a few social blunders. You might offend people without meaning to. Or you might misunderstand what others say and take offense when it's not intended. To make matters worse, something about cyberspace makes it easy to forget that you're interacting with other real people -- not just ASCII characters on a screen, but live human characters.
 
So, partly as a result of forgetting that people online are still real, and partly because they don't know the conventions, well-meaning cybernauts, especially new ones, make all kinds of mistakes.
 
The book Netiquette has a dual purpose: to help net newbies minimize their mistakes, and to help experienced cyberspace travelers help the newbies. The premise of the book is that most people would rather make friends than enemies, and that if you follow a few basic rules, you're less likely to make the kind of mistakes that will prevent you from making friends.
 
The list of core rules below, and the explanations that follow, are excerpted from the book. They are offered here as a set of general guidelines for cyberspace behavior. They won't answer all your Netiquette questions. But they should give you some basic principles to use in solving your own Netiquette dilemmas.
 
Rule 1: Remember the human
 
The golden rule your parents and your kindergarten teacher taught you was pretty simple: Do unto others as you'd have others do unto you. Imagine how you'd feel if you were in the other person's shoes. Stand up for yourself, but try not to hurt people's feelings.
 
In cyberspace, we state this in an even more basic manner: Remember the human.
 
When you communicate electronically, all you see is a computer screen. You don't have the opportunity to use facial expressions, gestures, and tone of voice to communicate your meaning; words -- lonely written words -- are all you've got. And that goes for your correspondent as well.
 
When you're holding a conversation online -- whether it's an email exchange or a response to a discussion group posting -- it's easy to misinterpret your correspondent's meaning. And it's frighteningly easy to forget that your correspondent is a person with feelings more or less like your own.
 
It's ironic, really. Computer networks bring people together who'd otherwise never meet. But the impersonality of the medium changes that meeting to something less -- well, less personal. Humans exchanging email often behave the way some people behind the wheel of a car do: They curse at other drivers, make obscene gestures, and generally behave like savages. Most of them would never act that way at work or at home. But the interposition of the machine seems to make it acceptable.
 
The message of Netiquette is that it's not acceptable. Yes, use your network connections to express yourself freely, explore strange new worlds, and boldly go where you've never gone before. But remember the Prime Directive of Netiquette: Those are real people out there.
 
Would you say it to the person's face?
 
Writer and Macintosh evangelist Guy Kawasaki tells a story about getting email from some fellow he's never met. Online, this fellow tells Guy that he's a bad writer with nothing interesting to say.
 
Unbelievably rude? Yes, but unfortunately, it happens all the time in cyberspace.
 
Maybe it's the awesome power of being able to send mail directly to a well-known writer like Guy. Maybe it's the fact that you can't see his face crumple in misery as he reads your cruel words. Whatever the reason, it's incredibly common.
 
Guy proposes a useful test for anything you're about to post or mail: Ask yourself, "Would I say this to the person's face?" If the answer is no, rewrite and reread. Repeat the process till you feel sure that you'd feel as comfortable saying these words to the live person as you do sending them through cyberspace.
 
Of course, it's possible that you'd feel great about saying something extremely rude to the person's face. In that case, Netiquette can't help you. Go get a copy of Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior.
 
Another reason not to be offensive online
 
When you communicate through cyberspace -- via email or on discussion groups -- your words are written. And chances are they're stored somewhere where you have no control over them. In other words, there's a good chance they can come back to haunt you.
 
Never forget the story of famous email user Oliver North. Ollie, you'll remember, was a great devotee of the White House email system, PROFS. He diligently deleted all incriminating notes he sent or received. What he didn't realize was that, somewhere else in the White House, computer room staff were equally diligently backing up the mainframe where his messages were stored. When he went on trial, all those handy backup tapes were readily available as evidence against him.
 
You don't have to be engaged in criminal activity to want to be careful. Any message you send could be saved or forwarded by its recipient. You have no control over where it goes.
 
Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life
In real life, most people are fairly law-abiding, either by disposition or because we're afraid of getting caught. In cyberspace, the chances of getting caught sometimes seem slim. And, perhaps because people sometimes forget that there's a human being on the other side of the computer, some people think that a lower standard of ethics or personal behavior is acceptable in cyberspace.
 
The confusion may be understandable, but these people are mistaken. Standards of behavior may be different in some areas of cyberspace, but they are not lower than in real life.
 
Be ethical
 
Don't believe anyone who says, "The only ethics out there are what you can get away with." This is a book about manners, not about ethics. But if you encounter an ethical dilemma in cyberspace, consult the code you follow in real life. Chances are good you'll find the answer.
 
One more point on Netiquette ethics: If you use shareware, pay for it. Paying for shareware encourages more people to write shareware. The few dollars probably won't mean much to you, and they benefit all of cyberspace in the long run.
 
Breaking the law is bad Netiquette
 
If you're tempted to do something that's illegal in cyberspace, chances are it's also bad Netiquette.
 
Some laws are obscure or complicated enough that it's hard to know how to follow them. And in some cases, we're still establishing how the law applies to cyberspace. Two examples are the laws on privacy (see Rule 8 and "Email Privacy -- a Grand Illusion" on page 125) and copyright (see "Copyright in Cyberspace" on page 133).
 
Again, this is a book on manners, not a legal manual. But Netiquette mandates that you do your best to act within the laws of society and cyberspace
 
Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace
Netiquette varies from domain to domain
 
What's perfectly acceptable in one area may be dreadfully rude in another. For example, in most TV discussion groups, passing on idle gossip is perfectly permissible. But throwing around unsubstantiated rumors in a journalists' mailing list will make you very unpopular there.
 
And because Netiquette is different in different places, it's important to know where you are. Thus the next corollary:
 
Lurk before you leap
 
When you enter a domain of cyberspace that's new to you, take a look around. Spend a while listening to the chat or reading the archives. Get a sense of how the people who are already there act. Then go ahead and participate.
 
Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth
 
It's a cliché that people today seem to have less time than ever before, even though (or perhaps because) we sleep less and have more labor-saving devices than our grandparents did. When you send email or post to a discussion group, you're taking up other people's time (or hoping to). It's your responsibility to ensure that the time they spend reading your posting isn't wasted.
 
The word "bandwidth" is sometimes used synonymously with time, but it's really a different thing. Bandwidth is the information-carrying capacity of the wires and channels that connect everyone in cyberspace. There's a limit to the amount of data that any piece of wiring can carry at any given moment -- even a state-of-the-art fiber-optic cable. The word "bandwidth" is also sometimes used to refer to the storage capacity of a host system. When you accidentally post the same note to the same newsgroup five times, you are wasting both time (of the people who check all five copies of the posting) and bandwidth (by sending repetitive information over the wires and requiring it to be stored somewhere).
 
You are not the center of cyberspace
 
Presumably, this reminder will be superfluous to most readers. But I include it anyway, because when you're working hard on a project and deeply involved in it, it's easy to forget that other people have concerns other than yours. So don't expect instant responses to all your questions, and don't assume that all readers will agree with -- or care about -- your passionate arguments.
 
Rules for discussion groups
 
Rule 4 has a number of implications for discussion group users. Most discussion group readers are already spending too much time sitting at the computer; their significant others, families, and roommates are drumming their fingers, wondering when to serve dinner, while those network maniacs are catching up on the latest way to housebreak a puppy or cook zucchini.
 
And many news-reading programs are slow, so just opening a posted note or article can take a while. Then the reader has to wade through all the header information to get to the meat of the message. No one is pleased when it turns out not to be worth the trouble. See "Netiquette for Discussion Groups" on page 65 for detailed rules.
 
To whom should messages be directed? (Or why "mailing list" could become a dirty word)
 
In the old days, people made copies with carbon paper. You could only make about five legible copies. So you thought good and hard about who you wanted to send those five copies to.
 
Today, it's as easy to copy practically anyone on your mail as it is not to. And we sometimes find ourselves copying people almost out of habit. In general, this is rude. People have less time than ever today, precisely because they have so much information to absorb. Before you copy people on your messages, ask yourself whether they really need to know. If the answer is no, don't waste their time. If the answer is maybe, think twice before you hit the send key.
 
Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
 
Take advantage of your anonymity
 
I don't want to give the impression that the net is a cold, cruel place full of people who just can't wait to insult each other. As in the world at large, most people who communicate online just want to be liked. Networks -- particularly discussion groups -- let you reach out to people you'd otherwise never meet. And none of them can see you. You won't be judged by the color of your skin, eyes, or hair, your weight, your age, or your clothing.
 
You will, however, be judged by the quality of your writing. For most people who choose to communicate online, this is an advantage; if they didn't enjoy using the written word, they wouldn't be there. So spelling and grammar do count.
 
If you're spending a lot of time on the net and you're shaky in these areas, it's worth brushing up on them. There are plenty of books available, but you'll learn more -- and possibly have more fun -- if you take a course. If you're an older adult , you don't have to take a "bonehead grammar" course with a bunch of bored teenagers. Instead, look for courses on proofreading and copyediting; they usually cover the basic rules of grammar pretty thoroughly, and they'll be filled with motivated students who are there because they want to be. Check your local community college and university extension catalogs -- you'll be amazed at what they offer. A side benefit is that taking courses involves meeting people you can actually see.
 
Know what you're talking about and make sense
 
Pay attention to the content of your writing. Be sure you know what you're talking about -- when you see yourself writing "it's my understanding that" or "I believe it's the case," ask yourself whether you really want to post this note before checking your facts. Bad information propagates like wildfire on the net. And once it's been through two or three iterations, you get the same distortion effect as in the party game "Operator": Whatever you originally said may be unrecognizable. (Of course, you could take this as a reason not to worry about the accuracy of your postings. But you're only responsible for what you post yourself, not for what anyone else does with it.)
 
In addition, make sure your notes are clear and logical. It's perfectly possible to write a paragraph that contains no errors in grammar or spelling, but still makes no sense whatsoever. This is most likely to happen when you're trying to impress someone by using a lot of long words that you don't really understand yourself. Trust me -- no one worth impressing will be impressed. It's better to keep it simple.
 
Don't post flame-bait
 
Finally, be pleasant and polite. Don't use offensive language, and don't be confrontational for the sake of confrontation.
 
Q. Is swearing acceptable on the net?
 
Only in those areas where sewage is considered an art form, e.g., the USENET newsgroup alt.tasteless. Usually, if you feel that cursing in some form is required, it's preferable to use amusing euphemisms like "effing" and "sugar." You may also use the classic asterisk filler -- for example, s***. The archness is somehow appropriate to the net, and you avoid offending anyone needlessly. And everyone will know exactly what you mean.
 
Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
 
Take advantage of your anonymity
Enter the poll to see my answer
#28 | 763 days ago

kteacher wrote:
True
but I was thinking Mr. Daly wasn't one of those great few
And thought  that he probably meant to rhyme
yet didn't put in the time
to do it correct

Sorry if my words aren't erect.
ITS OK I WAS JUST LETTEN YA KNOW 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#29 | 763 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
I GUESS YOU DON'T KNOW HOW PAINFUL IT IS TO BE 6 INCHES FROM YOUR SCREEN AND TRY TO TYPE CRUNCHED UP AND READ WHAT JERKS LIKE YOU DONT UNDERSTAND HERE TRY THIS SITE OUT SWEETY ITS REAL BTW COPY PASTE WORKS REAL GOOD TO HELP WITH ADOBE READER PROGRAMS  SO I CAN SEE WHAT PPL LIKE YOU HAVE TO SAY ITS SAD REALLY YOU NEED TO READ THIS BOOK DEAR 
 WHAT IS NETIQUETTE ?
What is Netiquette?
 Introduction
 
by Virginia Shea
 

What is Netiquette? Simply stated, it's network etiquette -- that is, the etiquette of cyberspace. And "etiquette" means "the forms required by good breeding or prescribed by authority to be required in social or official life." In other words, Netiquette is a set of rules for behaving properly online.
 
When you enter any new culture -- and cyberspace has its own culture -- you're liable to commit a few social blunders. You might offend people without meaning to. Or you might misunderstand what others say and take offense when it's not intended. To make matters worse, something about cyberspace makes it easy to forget that you're interacting with other real people -- not just ASCII characters on a screen, but live human characters.
 
So, partly as a result of forgetting that people online are still real, and partly because they don't know the conventions, well-meaning cybernauts, especially new ones, make all kinds of mistakes.
 
The book Netiquette has a dual purpose: to help net newbies minimize their mistakes, and to help experienced cyberspace travelers help the newbies. The premise of the book is that most people would rather make friends than enemies, and that if you follow a few basic rules, you're less likely to make the kind of mistakes that will prevent you from making friends.
 
The list of core rules below, and the explanations that follow, are excerpted from the book. They are offered here as a set of general guidelines for cyberspace behavior. They won't answer all your Netiquette questions. But they should give you some basic principles to use in solving your own Netiquette dilemmas.
 
Rule 1: Remember the human
 
The golden rule your parents and your kindergarten teacher taught you was pretty simple: Do unto others as you'd have others do unto you. Imagine how you'd feel if you were in the other person's shoes. Stand up for yourself, but try not to hurt people's feelings.
 
In cyberspace, we state this in an even more basic manner: Remember the human.
 
When you communicate electronically, all you see is a computer screen. You don't have the opportunity to use facial expressions, gestures, and tone of voice to communicate your meaning; words -- lonely written words -- are all you've got. And that goes for your correspondent as well.
 
When you're holding a conversation online -- whether it's an email exchange or a response to a discussion group posting -- it's easy to misinterpret your correspondent's meaning. And it's frighteningly easy to forget that your correspondent is a person with feelings more or less like your own.
 
It's ironic, really. Computer networks bring people together who'd otherwise never meet. But the impersonality of the medium changes that meeting to something less -- well, less personal. Humans exchanging email often behave the way some people behind the wheel of a car do: They curse at other drivers, make obscene gestures, and generally behave like savages. Most of them would never act that way at work or at home. But the interposition of the machine seems to make it acceptable.
 
The message of Netiquette is that it's not acceptable. Yes, use your network connections to express yourself freely, explore strange new worlds, and boldly go where you've never gone before. But remember the Prime Directive of Netiquette: Those are real people out there.
 
Would you say it to the person's face?
 
Writer and Macintosh evangelist Guy Kawasaki tells a story about getting email from some fellow he's never met. Online, this fellow tells Guy that he's a bad writer with nothing interesting to say.
 
Unbelievably rude? Yes, but unfortunately, it happens all the time in cyberspace.
 
Maybe it's the awesome power of being able to send mail directly to a well-known writer like Guy. Maybe it's the fact that you can't see his face crumple in misery as he reads your cruel words. Whatever the reason, it's incredibly common.
 
Guy proposes a useful test for anything you're about to post or mail: Ask yourself, "Would I say this to the person's face?" If the answer is no, rewrite and reread. Repeat the process till you feel sure that you'd feel as comfortable saying these words to the live person as you do sending them through cyberspace.
 
Of course, it's possible that you'd feel great about saying something extremely rude to the person's face. In that case, Netiquette can't help you. Go get a copy of Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior.
 
Another reason not to be offensive online
 
When you communicate through cyberspace -- via email or on discussion groups -- your words are written. And chances are they're stored somewhere where you have no control over them. In other words, there's a good chance they can come back to haunt you.
 
Never forget the story of famous email user Oliver North. Ollie, you'll remember, was a great devotee of the White House email system, PROFS. He diligently deleted all incriminating notes he sent or received. What he didn't realize was that, somewhere else in the White House, computer room staff were equally diligently backing up the mainframe where his messages were stored. When he went on trial, all those handy backup tapes were readily available as evidence against him.
 
You don't have to be engaged in criminal activity to want to be careful. Any message you send could be saved or forwarded by its recipient. You have no control over where it goes.
 
Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life
In real life, most people are fairly law-abiding, either by disposition or because we're afraid of getting caught. In cyberspace, the chances of getting caught sometimes seem slim. And, perhaps because people sometimes forget that there's a human being on the other side of the computer, some people think that a lower standard of ethics or personal behavior is acceptable in cyberspace.
 
The confusion may be understandable, but these people are mistaken. Standards of behavior may be different in some areas of cyberspace, but they are not lower than in real life.
 
Be ethical
 
Don't believe anyone who says, "The only ethics out there are what you can get away with." This is a book about manners, not about ethics. But if you encounter an ethical dilemma in cyberspace, consult the code you follow in real life. Chances are good you'll find the answer.
 
One more point on Netiquette ethics: If you use shareware, pay for it. Paying for shareware encourages more people to write shareware. The few dollars probably won't mean much to you, and they benefit all of cyberspace in the long run.
 
Breaking the law is bad Netiquette
 
If you're tempted to do something that's illegal in cyberspace, chances are it's also bad Netiquette.
 
Some laws are obscure or complicated enough that it's hard to know how to follow them. And in some cases, we're still establishing how the law applies to cyberspace. Two examples are the laws on privacy (see Rule 8 and "Email Privacy -- a Grand Illusion" on page 125) and copyright (see "Copyright in Cyberspace" on page 133).
 
Again, this is a book on manners, not a legal manual. But Netiquette mandates that you do your best to act within the laws of society and cyberspace
 
Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace
Netiquette varies from domain to domain
 
What's perfectly acceptable in one area may be dreadfully rude in another. For example, in most TV discussion groups, passing on idle gossip is perfectly permissible. But throwing around unsubstantiated rumors in a journalists' mailing list will make you very unpopular there.
 
And because Netiquette is different in different places, it's important to know where you are. Thus the next corollary:
 
Lurk before you leap
 
When you enter a domain of cyberspace that's new to you, take a look around. Spend a while listening to the chat or reading the archives. Get a sense of how the people who are already there act. Then go ahead and participate.
 
Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth
 
It's a cliché that people today seem to have less time than ever before, even though (or perhaps because) we sleep less and have more labor-saving devices than our grandparents did. When you send email or post to a discussion group, you're taking up other people's time (or hoping to). It's your responsibility to ensure that the time they spend reading your posting isn't wasted.
 
The word "bandwidth" is sometimes used synonymously with time, but it's really a different thing. Bandwidth is the information-carrying capacity of the wires and channels that connect everyone in cyberspace. There's a limit to the amount of data that any piece of wiring can carry at any given moment -- even a state-of-the-art fiber-optic cable. The word "bandwidth" is also sometimes used to refer to the storage capacity of a host system. When you accidentally post the same note to the same newsgroup five times, you are wasting both time (of the people who check all five copies of the posting) and bandwidth (by sending repetitive information over the wires and requiring it to be stored somewhere).
 
You are not the center of cyberspace
 
Presumably, this reminder will be superfluous to most readers. But I include it anyway, because when you're working hard on a project and deeply involved in it, it's easy to forget that other people have concerns other than yours. So don't expect instant responses to all your questions, and don't assume that all readers will agree with -- or care about -- your passionate arguments.
 
Rules for discussion groups
 
Rule 4 has a number of implications for discussion group users. Most discussion group readers are already spending too much time sitting at the computer; their significant others, families, and roommates are drumming their fingers, wondering when to serve dinner, while those network maniacs are catching up on the latest way to housebreak a puppy or cook zucchini.
 
And many news-reading programs are slow, so just opening a posted note or article can take a while. Then the reader has to wade through all the header information to get to the meat of the message. No one is pleased when it turns out not to be worth the trouble. See "Netiquette for Discussion Groups" on page 65 for detailed rules.
 
To whom should messages be directed? (Or why "mailing list" could become a dirty word)
 
In the old days, people made copies with carbon paper. You could only make about five legible copies. So you thought good and hard about who you wanted to send those five copies to.
 
Today, it's as easy to copy practically anyone on your mail as it is not to. And we sometimes find ourselves copying people almost out of habit. In general, this is rude. People have less time than ever today, precisely because they have so much information to absorb. Before you copy people on your messages, ask yourself whether they really need to know. If the answer is no, don't waste their time. If the answer is maybe, think twice before you hit the send key.
 
Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
 
Take advantage of your anonymity
 
I don't want to give the impression that the net is a cold, cruel place full of people who just can't wait to insult each other. As in the world at large, most people who communicate online just want to be liked. Networks -- particularly discussion groups -- let you reach out to people you'd otherwise never meet. And none of them can see you. You won't be judged by the color of your skin, eyes, or hair, your weight, your age, or your clothing.
 
You will, however, be judged by the quality of your writing. For most people who choose to communicate online, this is an advantage; if they didn't enjoy using the written word, they wouldn't be there. So spelling and grammar do count.
 
If you're spending a lot of time on the net and you're shaky in these areas, it's worth brushing up on them. There are plenty of books available, but you'll learn more -- and possibly have more fun -- if you take a course. If you're an older adult , you don't have to take a "bonehead grammar" course with a bunch of bored teenagers. Instead, look for courses on proofreading and copyediting; they usually cover the basic rules of grammar pretty thoroughly, and they'll be filled with motivated students who are there because they want to be. Check your local community college and university extension catalogs -- you'll be amazed at what they offer. A side benefit is that taking courses involves meeting people you can actually see.
 
Know what you're talking about and make sense
 
Pay attention to the content of your writing. Be sure you know what you're talking about -- when you see yourself writing "it's my understanding that" or "I believe it's the case," ask yourself whether you really want to post this note before checking your facts. Bad information propagates like wildfire on the net. And once it's been through two or three iterations, you get the same distortion effect as in the party game "Operator": Whatever you originally said may be unrecognizable. (Of course, you could take this as a reason not to worry about the accuracy of your postings. But you're only responsible for what you post yourself, not for what anyone else does with it.)
 
In addition, make sure your notes are clear and logical. It's perfectly possible to write a paragraph that contains no errors in grammar or spelling, but still makes no sense whatsoever. This is most likely to happen when you're trying to impress someone by using a lot of long words that you don't really understand yourself. Trust me -- no one worth impressing will be impressed. It's better to keep it simple.
 
Don't post flame-bait
 
Finally, be pleasant and polite. Don't use offensive language, and don't be confrontational for the sake of confrontation.
 
Q. Is swearing acceptable on the net?
 
Only in those areas where sewage is considered an art form, e.g., the USENET newsgroup alt.tasteless. Usually, if you feel that cursing in some form is required, it's preferable to use amusing euphemisms like "effing" and "sugar." You may also use the classic asterisk filler -- for example, s***. The archness is somehow appropriate to the net, and you avoid offending anyone needlessly. And everyone will know exactly what you mean.
 
Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
 
Take advantage of your anonymity
The Core Rules of Netiquette — Summary
 
Rule 1. Remember the human.
 
Never forget that the person reading your mail or posting is, indeed, a person, with feelings that can be hurt.
 
Corollary 1 to Rule #1: It's not nice to hurt other people's feelings.
 
Corollary 2: Never mail or post anything you wouldn't say to your reader's face.
 
Corollary 3: Notify your readers when flaming.
 
Rule 2. Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life.
 
Corollary 1: Be ethical.
 
Corollary 2: Breaking the law is bad Netiquette.
 
Rule 3. Know where you are in cyberspace.
 
Corollary 1: Netiquette varies from domain to domain.
 
Corollary 2: Lurk before you leap.
 
Rule 4. Respect other people's time and bandwidth.
 
Corollary 1: It's OK to think that what you're doing at the moment is the most important thing in the universe, but don't expect anyone else to agree with you.
 
Corollary 2: Post messages to the appropriate discussion group.
 
Corollary 3: Try not to ask stupid questions on discussion groups.
 
Corollary 4: Read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) document.
 
Corollary 5: When appropriate, use private email instead of posting to the group.
 
Corollary 6: Don't post subscribe, unsubscribe, or FAQ requests.
 
Corollary 7: Don't waste expert readers' time by posting basic information.
Corollary 8: If you disagree with the premise of a particular discussion group, don't waste the time and bandwidth of the members by telling them how stupid they are. Just stay away.
 
Corollary 9: Conserve bandwidth when you retrieve information from a host or server.
 
Rule 5. Make yourself look good online.
 
Corollary 1: Check grammar and spelling before you post.
 
Corollary 2: Know what you're talking about and make sense.
 
Corollary 3: Don't post flame-bait.
 
Rule 6. Share expert knowledge.
 
Corollary 1: Offer answers and help to people who ask questions on discussion groups.
 
Corollary 2: If you've received email answers to a posted question, summarize them and post the summary to the discussion group.
 
Rule 7. Help keep flame wars under control.
 
Corollary 1: Don't respond to flame-bait.
 
Corollary 2: Don't post spelling or grammar flames.
 
Corollary 3: If you've posted flame-bait or perpetuated a flame war, apologize.
 
Rule 8. Respect other people's privacy.
 
Don't read other people's private email.
 
Rule 9. Don't abuse your power.
 
The more power you have, the more important it is that you use it well.
 
Rule 10. Be forgiving of other people's mistakes.
 
You were a network newbie once too!
Enter the poll to see my answer
#30 | 763 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
The Core Rules of Netiquette — Summary
 
Rule 1. Remember the human.
 
Never forget that the person reading your mail or posting is, indeed, a person, with feelings that can be hurt.
 
Corollary 1 to Rule #1: It's not nice to hurt other people's feelings.
 
Corollary 2: Never mail or post anything you wouldn't say to your reader's face.
 
Corollary 3: Notify your readers when flaming.
 
Rule 2. Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life.
 
Corollary 1: Be ethical.
 
Corollary 2: Breaking the law is bad Netiquette.
 
Rule 3. Know where you are in cyberspace.
 
Corollary 1: Netiquette varies from domain to domain.
 
Corollary 2: Lurk before you leap.
 
Rule 4. Respect other people's time and bandwidth.
 
Corollary 1: It's OK to think that what you're doing at the moment is the most important thing in the universe, but don't expect anyone else to agree with you.
 
Corollary 2: Post messages to the appropriate discussion group.
 
Corollary 3: Try not to ask stupid questions on discussion groups.
 
Corollary 4: Read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) document.
 
Corollary 5: When appropriate, use private email instead of posting to the group.
 
Corollary 6: Don't post subscribe, unsubscribe, or FAQ requests.
 
Corollary 7: Don't waste expert readers' time by posting basic information.
Corollary 8: If you disagree with the premise of a particular discussion group, don't waste the time and bandwidth of the members by telling them how stupid they are. Just stay away.
 
Corollary 9: Conserve bandwidth when you retrieve information from a host or server.
 
Rule 5. Make yourself look good online.
 
Corollary 1: Check grammar and spelling before you post.
 
Corollary 2: Know what you're talking about and make sense.
 
Corollary 3: Don't post flame-bait.
 
Rule 6. Share expert knowledge.
 
Corollary 1: Offer answers and help to people who ask questions on discussion groups.
 
Corollary 2: If you've received email answers to a posted question, summarize them and post the summary to the discussion group.
 
Rule 7. Help keep flame wars under control.
 
Corollary 1: Don't respond to flame-bait.
 
Corollary 2: Don't post spelling or grammar flames.
 
Corollary 3: If you've posted flame-bait or perpetuated a flame war, apologize.
 
Rule 8. Respect other people's privacy.
 
Don't read other people's private email.
 
Rule 9. Don't abuse your power.
 
The more power you have, the more important it is that you use it well.
 
Rule 10. Be forgiving of other people's mistakes.
 
You were a network newbie once too!
NOW HOW MANY HAVE YOU BROKE HERE MY FRIEND
Enter the poll to see my answer
#31 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
So you only get to read what YOU type unless we post in all caps back?  So im guessing the only word you can read out of this whole post is "you" from my previous sentence.   And im assuming that its very confusing for you to see blurryblurryblurryblurryYOUblurryblurryblurryblurry.  I apologize.   Wait..you couldnt see that...I APOLOGIZE.
I GUESS YOU DON'T KNOW HOW PAINFUL IT IS TO BE 6 INCHES FROM YOUR SCREEN AND TRY TO TYPE CRUNCHED UP AND READ WHAT JERKS LIKE YOU DONT UNDERSTAND HERE TRY THIS SITE OUT SWEETY ITS REAL BTW COPY PASTE WORKS REAL GOOD TO HELP WITH ADOBE READER PROGRAMS  SO I CAN SEE WHAT PPL LIKE YOU HAVE TO SAY ITS SAD REALLY YOU NEED TO READ THIS BOOK DEAR 
 WHAT IS NETIQUETTE ?
What is Netiquette?
 Introduction
 
by Virginia Shea
 

What is Netiquette? Simply stated, it's network etiquette -- that is, the etiquette of cyberspace. And "etiquette" means "the forms required by good breeding or prescribed by authority to be required in social or official life." In other words, Netiquette is a set of rules for behaving properly online.
 
When you enter any new culture -- and cyberspace has its own culture -- you're liable to commit a few social blunders. You might offend people without meaning to. Or you might misunderstand what others say and take offense when it's not intended. To make matters worse, something about cyberspace makes it easy to forget that you're interacting with other real people -- not just ASCII characters on a screen, but live human characters.
 
So, partly as a result of forgetting that people online are still real, and partly because they don't know the conventions, well-meaning cybernauts, especially new ones, make all kinds of mistakes.
 
The book Netiquette has a dual purpose: to help net newbies minimize their mistakes, and to help experienced cyberspace travelers help the newbies. The premise of the book is that most people would rather make friends than enemies, and that if you follow a few basic rules, you're less likely to make the kind of mistakes that will prevent you from making friends.
 
The list of core rules below, and the explanations that follow, are excerpted from the book. They are offered here as a set of general guidelines for cyberspace behavior. They won't answer all your Netiquette questions. But they should give you some basic principles to use in solving your own Netiquette dilemmas.
 
Rule 1: Remember the human
 
The golden rule your parents and your kindergarten teacher taught you was pretty simple: Do unto others as you'd have others do unto you. Imagine how you'd feel if you were in the other person's shoes. Stand up for yourself, but try not to hurt people's feelings.
 
In cyberspace, we state this in an even more basic manner: Remember the human.
 
When you communicate electronically, all you see is a computer screen. You don't have the opportunity to use facial expressions, gestures, and tone of voice to communicate your meaning; words -- lonely written words -- are all you've got. And that goes for your correspondent as well.
 
When you're holding a conversation online -- whether it's an email exchange or a response to a discussion group posting -- it's easy to misinterpret your correspondent's meaning. And it's frighteningly easy to forget that your correspondent is a person with feelings more or less like your own.
 
It's ironic, really. Computer networks bring people together who'd otherwise never meet. But the impersonality of the medium changes that meeting to something less -- well, less personal. Humans exchanging email often behave the way some people behind the wheel of a car do: They curse at other drivers, make obscene gestures, and generally behave like savages. Most of them would never act that way at work or at home. But the interposition of the machine seems to make it acceptable.
 
The message of Netiquette is that it's not acceptable. Yes, use your network connections to express yourself freely, explore strange new worlds, and boldly go where you've never gone before. But remember the Prime Directive of Netiquette: Those are real people out there.
 
Would you say it to the person's face?
 
Writer and Macintosh evangelist Guy Kawasaki tells a story about getting email from some fellow he's never met. Online, this fellow tells Guy that he's a bad writer with nothing interesting to say.
 
Unbelievably rude? Yes, but unfortunately, it happens all the time in cyberspace.
 
Maybe it's the awesome power of being able to send mail directly to a well-known writer like Guy. Maybe it's the fact that you can't see his face crumple in misery as he reads your cruel words. Whatever the reason, it's incredibly common.
 
Guy proposes a useful test for anything you're about to post or mail: Ask yourself, "Would I say this to the person's face?" If the answer is no, rewrite and reread. Repeat the process till you feel sure that you'd feel as comfortable saying these words to the live person as you do sending them through cyberspace.
 
Of course, it's possible that you'd feel great about saying something extremely rude to the person's face. In that case, Netiquette can't help you. Go get a copy of Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior.
 
Another reason not to be offensive online
 
When you communicate through cyberspace -- via email or on discussion groups -- your words are written. And chances are they're stored somewhere where you have no control over them. In other words, there's a good chance they can come back to haunt you.
 
Never forget the story of famous email user Oliver North. Ollie, you'll remember, was a great devotee of the White House email system, PROFS. He diligently deleted all incriminating notes he sent or received. What he didn't realize was that, somewhere else in the White House, computer room staff were equally diligently backing up the mainframe where his messages were stored. When he went on trial, all those handy backup tapes were readily available as evidence against him.
 
You don't have to be engaged in criminal activity to want to be careful. Any message you send could be saved or forwarded by its recipient. You have no control over where it goes.
 
Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life
In real life, most people are fairly law-abiding, either by disposition or because we're afraid of getting caught. In cyberspace, the chances of getting caught sometimes seem slim. And, perhaps because people sometimes forget that there's a human being on the other side of the computer, some people think that a lower standard of ethics or personal behavior is acceptable in cyberspace.
 
The confusion may be understandable, but these people are mistaken. Standards of behavior may be different in some areas of cyberspace, but they are not lower than in real life.
 
Be ethical
 
Don't believe anyone who says, "The only ethics out there are what you can get away with." This is a book about manners, not about ethics. But if you encounter an ethical dilemma in cyberspace, consult the code you follow in real life. Chances are good you'll find the answer.
 
One more point on Netiquette ethics: If you use shareware, pay for it. Paying for shareware encourages more people to write shareware. The few dollars probably won't mean much to you, and they benefit all of cyberspace in the long run.
 
Breaking the law is bad Netiquette
 
If you're tempted to do something that's illegal in cyberspace, chances are it's also bad Netiquette.
 
Some laws are obscure or complicated enough that it's hard to know how to follow them. And in some cases, we're still establishing how the law applies to cyberspace. Two examples are the laws on privacy (see Rule 8 and "Email Privacy -- a Grand Illusion" on page 125) and copyright (see "Copyright in Cyberspace" on page 133).
 
Again, this is a book on manners, not a legal manual. But Netiquette mandates that you do your best to act within the laws of society and cyberspace
 
Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace
Netiquette varies from domain to domain
 
What's perfectly acceptable in one area may be dreadfully rude in another. For example, in most TV discussion groups, passing on idle gossip is perfectly permissible. But throwing around unsubstantiated rumors in a journalists' mailing list will make you very unpopular there.
 
And because Netiquette is different in different places, it's important to know where you are. Thus the next corollary:
 
Lurk before you leap
 
When you enter a domain of cyberspace that's new to you, take a look around. Spend a while listening to the chat or reading the archives. Get a sense of how the people who are already there act. Then go ahead and participate.
 
Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth
 
It's a cliché that people today seem to have less time than ever before, even though (or perhaps because) we sleep less and have more labor-saving devices than our grandparents did. When you send email or post to a discussion group, you're taking up other people's time (or hoping to). It's your responsibility to ensure that the time they spend reading your posting isn't wasted.
 
The word "bandwidth" is sometimes used synonymously with time, but it's really a different thing. Bandwidth is the information-carrying capacity of the wires and channels that connect everyone in cyberspace. There's a limit to the amount of data that any piece of wiring can carry at any given moment -- even a state-of-the-art fiber-optic cable. The word "bandwidth" is also sometimes used to refer to the storage capacity of a host system. When you accidentally post the same note to the same newsgroup five times, you are wasting both time (of the people who check all five copies of the posting) and bandwidth (by sending repetitive information over the wires and requiring it to be stored somewhere).
 
You are not the center of cyberspace
 
Presumably, this reminder will be superfluous to most readers. But I include it anyway, because when you're working hard on a project and deeply involved in it, it's easy to forget that other people have concerns other than yours. So don't expect instant responses to all your questions, and don't assume that all readers will agree with -- or care about -- your passionate arguments.
 
Rules for discussion groups
 
Rule 4 has a number of implications for discussion group users. Most discussion group readers are already spending too much time sitting at the computer; their significant others, families, and roommates are drumming their fingers, wondering when to serve dinner, while those network maniacs are catching up on the latest way to housebreak a puppy or cook zucchini.
 
And many news-reading programs are slow, so just opening a posted note or article can take a while. Then the reader has to wade through all the header information to get to the meat of the message. No one is pleased when it turns out not to be worth the trouble. See "Netiquette for Discussion Groups" on page 65 for detailed rules.
 
To whom should messages be directed? (Or why "mailing list" could become a dirty word)
 
In the old days, people made copies with carbon paper. You could only make about five legible copies. So you thought good and hard about who you wanted to send those five copies to.
 
Today, it's as easy to copy practically anyone on your mail as it is not to. And we sometimes find ourselves copying people almost out of habit. In general, this is rude. People have less time than ever today, precisely because they have so much information to absorb. Before you copy people on your messages, ask yourself whether they really need to know. If the answer is no, don't waste their time. If the answer is maybe, think twice before you hit the send key.
 
Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
 
Take advantage of your anonymity
 
I don't want to give the impression that the net is a cold, cruel place full of people who just can't wait to insult each other. As in the world at large, most people who communicate online just want to be liked. Networks -- particularly discussion groups -- let you reach out to people you'd otherwise never meet. And none of them can see you. You won't be judged by the color of your skin, eyes, or hair, your weight, your age, or your clothing.
 
You will, however, be judged by the quality of your writing. For most people who choose to communicate online, this is an advantage; if they didn't enjoy using the written word, they wouldn't be there. So spelling and grammar do count.
 
If you're spending a lot of time on the net and you're shaky in these areas, it's worth brushing up on them. There are plenty of books available, but you'll learn more -- and possibly have more fun -- if you take a course. If you're an older adult , you don't have to take a "bonehead grammar" course with a bunch of bored teenagers. Instead, look for courses on proofreading and copyediting; they usually cover the basic rules of grammar pretty thoroughly, and they'll be filled with motivated students who are there because they want to be. Check your local community college and university extension catalogs -- you'll be amazed at what they offer. A side benefit is that taking courses involves meeting people you can actually see.
 
Know what you're talking about and make sense
 
Pay attention to the content of your writing. Be sure you know what you're talking about -- when you see yourself writing "it's my understanding that" or "I believe it's the case," ask yourself whether you really want to post this note before checking your facts. Bad information propagates like wildfire on the net. And once it's been through two or three iterations, you get the same distortion effect as in the party game "Operator": Whatever you originally said may be unrecognizable. (Of course, you could take this as a reason not to worry about the accuracy of your postings. But you're only responsible for what you post yourself, not for what anyone else does with it.)
 
In addition, make sure your notes are clear and logical. It's perfectly possible to write a paragraph that contains no errors in grammar or spelling, but still makes no sense whatsoever. This is most likely to happen when you're trying to impress someone by using a lot of long words that you don't really understand yourself. Trust me -- no one worth impressing will be impressed. It's better to keep it simple.
 
Don't post flame-bait
 
Finally, be pleasant and polite. Don't use offensive language, and don't be confrontational for the sake of confrontation.
 
Q. Is swearing acceptable on the net?
 
Only in those areas where sewage is considered an art form, e.g., the USENET newsgroup alt.tasteless. Usually, if you feel that cursing in some form is required, it's preferable to use amusing euphemisms like "effing" and "sugar." You may also use the classic asterisk filler -- for example, s***. The archness is somehow appropriate to the net, and you avoid offending anyone needlessly. And everyone will know exactly what you mean.
 
Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
 
Take advantage of your anonymity
The Core Rules of Netiquette — Summary
 
Rule 1. Remember the human.
 
Never forget that the person reading your mail or posting is, indeed, a person, with feelings that can be hurt.
 
Corollary 1 to Rule #1: It's not nice to hurt other people's feelings.
 
Corollary 2: Never mail or post anything you wouldn't say to your reader's face.
 
Corollary 3: Notify your readers when flaming.
 
Rule 2. Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life.
 
Corollary 1: Be ethical.
 
Corollary 2: Breaking the law is bad Netiquette.
 
Rule 3. Know where you are in cyberspace.
 
Corollary 1: Netiquette varies from domain to domain.
 
Corollary 2: Lurk before you leap.
 
Rule 4. Respect other people's time and bandwidth.
 
Corollary 1: It's OK to think that what you're doing at the moment is the most important thing in the universe, but don't expect anyone else to agree with you.
 
Corollary 2: Post messages to the appropriate discussion group.
 
Corollary 3: Try not to ask stupid questions on discussion groups.
 
Corollary 4: Read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) document.
 
Corollary 5: When appropriate, use private email instead of posting to the group.
 
Corollary 6: Don't post subscribe, unsubscribe, or FAQ requests.
 
Corollary 7: Don't waste expert readers' time by posting basic information.
Corollary 8: If you disagree with the premise of a particular discussion group, don't waste the time and bandwidth of the members by telling them how stupid they are. Just stay away.
 
Corollary 9: Conserve bandwidth when you retrieve information from a host or server.
 
Rule 5. Make yourself look good online.
 
Corollary 1: Check grammar and spelling before you post.
 
Corollary 2: Know what you're talking about and make sense.
 
Corollary 3: Don't post flame-bait.
 
Rule 6. Share expert knowledge.
 
Corollary 1: Offer answers and help to people who ask questions on discussion groups.
 
Corollary 2: If you've received email answers to a posted question, summarize them and post the summary to the discussion group.
 
Rule 7. Help keep flame wars under control.
 
Corollary 1: Don't respond to flame-bait.
 
Corollary 2: Don't post spelling or grammar flames.
 
Corollary 3: If you've posted flame-bait or perpetuated a flame war, apologize.
 
Rule 8. Respect other people's privacy.
 
Don't read other people's private email.
 
Rule 9. Don't abuse your power.
 
The more power you have, the more important it is that you use it well.
 
Rule 10. Be forgiving of other people's mistakes.
 
HOW MANY HAVE YOU BROKEN IN HERE MY FRIEND JASON
Enter the poll to see my answer
#32 | 763 days ago

Ok ok...i got it the first 73 times.

er...

OK OK I GOT IT THE FIRST 73 TIMES.
#33 | 763 days ago

My head...
#34 | 763 days ago

w
t
f

awesome.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#35 | 763 days ago

NOW BACK TO OUR FANIQ POEM
Enter the poll to see my answer
#36 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
Ok ok...i got it the first 73 times.

er...

OK OK I GOT IT THE FIRST 73 TIMES.
Even tho this made me laugh... Irma "can" see normal print. It's when she's typing something she has to use caps because she is all crunched over the keyboard in order to type. So by using caps she can quick glance at the screen to look for typos. When she only needs to read she can just be real close to the screen. Does that make sense now?  Some people can't walk and she can't see without difficulty. It's a handicap all the same.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#37 | 763 days ago


amusing euphemisms  ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Cheesus
#38 | 763 days ago

DallasFan55 wrote:
Even tho this made me laugh... Irma "can" see normal print. It's when she's typing something she has to use caps because she is all crunched over the keyboard in order to type. So by using caps she can quick glance at the screen to look for typos. When she only needs to read she can just be real close to the screen. Does that make sense now?  Some people can't walk and she can't see without difficulty. It's a handicap all the same.
THANK YOU SIS
Enter the poll to see my answer
#39 | 763 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
THANK YOU SIS
Your very welcome. smiley
Enter the poll to see my answer
#40 | 763 days ago

DallasFan55 wrote:
Your very welcome. smiley
I COULDN'T HELP TO PUT THAT UP THERE LOL I AM GLAD FOR THAT BOOK
Enter the poll to see my answer
#41 | 763 days ago

insert J face <here>
#42 | 763 days ago

Joe_L wrote:
insert J face <here>
How close is that to your "O" face?
#43 | 763 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
How close is that to your "O" face?
took a second to find it.

you tell me.

#44 | 763 days ago
John_Daly (+)

(Edited by John_Daly)
kteacher wrote:
You are right! 
Two of your lines were indeed quite alright. 
Well done!
It better not be your last one.
San Diego State lost today, like leaves on a wounded branch they fell apart at the root.
Were they ever really as good as their record showed or did they even deserve this early boot?
Angrly I yelled at the radio, with passion and rage for just one made basket, just one 3 point score.
They never stood a chance, like blades of grass in a catagory F5 tornado, they could stand no more.
College Basketball season is over for me, I lived and died with every three, but the loss killed ther roar.
I wait with bated breath for next years season, the anticipation of a child on Christmas eve, I wait for the game like a prisoner awaits his execution. Until next year I am saddened.




*Lets make this the poem for Fan IQ.*


                                                                                                                      John Daly.
#45 | 763 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
San Diego State lost today, like leaves on a wounded branch they fell apart at the root.
Were they ever really as good as their record showed or did they even deserve this early boot?
Angrly I yelled at the radio, with passion and rage for just one made basket, just one 3 point score.
They never stood a chance, like blades of grass in a catagory F5 tornado, they could stand no more.
College Basketball season is over for me, I lived and died with every three, but the loss killed ther roar.
I wait with bated breath for next years season, the anticipation of a child on Christmas eve, I wait for the game like a prisoner awaits his execution. Until next year I am saddened.




*Lets make this the poem for Fan IQ.*


                                                                                                                      John Daly.
#46 | 761 days ago

ohwell_ wrote:
THESE ARE THE BEST HUGS
WHEN GIVIN FROM THE HEART
AND SPONTANEOUS IS ABOUND
EVERYONE THE WORLD AROUND
COME AND GET YOUR FREE HUGS
FANIQ FANS ALL DOING THEIR PART.........
THANK YOU FOR THE INSPIRATION.... 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#47 | 761 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
THESE ARE THE BEST HUGS
WHEN GIVIN FROM THE HEART
AND SPONTANEOUS IS ABOUND
EVERYONE THE WORLD AROUND
COME AND GET YOUR FREE HUGS
FANIQ FANS ALL DOING THEIR PART.........
THANK YOU FOR THE INSPIRATION.... 
TY
Enter the poll to see my answer
#48 | 761 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
TY
NASCAR TIME IS HERE,
AND RACE DAY IS NEAR,
EVERY FAN TAKE YOUR SEAT,
NASCAR RACING CAN'T BE BEAT,
ROUND AND ROUND THEY GO,
RACING FROM THE POLE,
FANIQ FANS CHEERING FROM THE SOUL
ROOTING FOR THEIR CAR TO GO
WANTING THEIR CAR TO WIN
RACING LIKE THE WIND,
TRYING TO BUMP N RUN,
AND HAVE THEIR FUN,
AND CAUTION TO CRASHES
FENDERS N DOORS BASHES
RACING TO THE END
CHECKERED FLAG WINS
INTO THE WINNERS CIRCLE WE GO,
NASCAR IS THE BEST FASTEST SHOW
SO FANIQ FANS CHEER
BECAUSE NASCAR BABY IS HERE
BY IRMA
Enter the poll to see my answer
#49 | 761 days ago
John_Daly (+)

irmacourt wrote:
NASCAR TIME IS HERE,
AND RACE DAY IS NEAR,
EVERY FAN TAKE YOUR SEAT,
NASCAR RACING CAN'T BE BEAT,
ROUND AND ROUND THEY GO,
RACING FROM THE POLE,
FANIQ FANS CHEERING FROM THE SOUL
ROOTING FOR THEIR CAR TO GO
WANTING THEIR CAR TO WIN
RACING LIKE THE WIND,
TRYING TO BUMP N RUN,
AND HAVE THEIR FUN,
AND CAUTION TO CRASHES
FENDERS N DOORS BASHES
RACING TO THE END
CHECKERED FLAG WINS
INTO THE WINNERS CIRCLE WE GO,
NASCAR IS THE BEST FASTEST SHOW
SO FANIQ FANS CHEER
BECAUSE NASCAR BABY IS HERE
BY IRMA
I wrote a poem about Baseball right now...


Spring has sprung, the trees once looking of grimly death now blossom with new life. There is a tingle in my body that stings like a knife, its a feeling I get every year....baseball is near.  The sights, the sounds, the giant fields of grass, a sea of fans gather as a mass. Baseball is here for one and all...baseball is here so lets play ball.   (Also cheer for faniq louder than any other site)




                                                                                                                                                       By John Daly.




                                                                                         
#50 | 728 days ago

AS FAR  AS  ME  AND MY CAPS,I CAN'T READ MY RESPOND VERY WELL WITHOUT THEM,YOU'LL POST'S I HAVE  USE A  ZOOM IN  GLASS TO  READ  THE BEST ONE'S, I NEVER WAS.VERY GOOD IN ENGLISH  EITHER,AFTER 40 YRS BEING IN  SCHOOL.I HAVE FORGOTTEN  THE WAY THE SENTENCE GO TOGHTER AND TO SPELL SOME WORDS.THE RIGHT WAY.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#51 | 728 days ago

I  WILL  CHEER FOR THE  CARDS& HOGS ,WITH  A  JIG, JIG , JOG'S AND  LOVE MY CARDS TOO
THAT IS  WHY  I COME UP  HERE TO  DO.
I LIKE THE CUBS TO  I CHEER FOR THEM  WHILE I AM IN THE TUBS I LIKE TO RAVES BOUT  MY BRAVES 
UNTIL  THEY EACH PLAY  MY CARDS.
THEN  I CHEER FOR ST LOUIS WITH MY  MY NEPHEW  HUEY AND DEWEY &LOUIE.
THE RAZORBACKS   HAVE AN  ATTACK  THAT CAN'T BE  BEAT WITH  A STICK THEY HAVE ALL SORT TRICK'S  IN THE PEN
WHEN IT COMES N.C.A.A FOOTBALL SEASON YOU CAN FIND ME  IN MY DEN..

I LIKE THE  COWBOYS TOO A YOU'LL FIND ME IN MY DENS WITH MY  JUMPING UP DAY  WITH MY TOY'S AND SHOUTING  IN JOY .
Enter the poll to see my answer
#52 | 728 days ago

I  WILL  CHEER FOR THE  CARDS& HOGS ,WITH  A  JIG, JIG , JOG'S AND  LOVE MY CARDS TOO
THAT IS  WHY  I COME UP  HERE TO  DO.
I LIKE THE CUBS TO  I CHEER FOR THEM  WHILE I AM IN THE TUBS I LIKE TO RAVES BOUT  MY BRAVES 
UNTIL  THEY EACH PLAY  MY CARDS.
THEN  I CHEER FOR ST LOUIS WITH MY  MY NEPHEW  HUEY AND DEWEY &LOUIE.
THE RAZORBACKS   HAVE AN  ATTACK  THAT CAN'T BE  BEAT WITH  A STICK THEY HAVE ALL SORT TRICK'S  IN THE PEN
WHEN IT COMES N.C.A.A FOOTBALL SEASON YOU CAN FIND ME  IN MY DEN..

I LIKE THE  COWBOYS TOO A YOU'LL FIND ME IN MY DENS WITH MY  JUMPING UP DAY  WITH MY TOY'S AND SHOUTING  IN JOY .
Enter the poll to see my answer
#53 | 728 days ago

TO BE  HONEST HERE  IRMA  I DON'T  KNOW OTHER BOUT  NASCAR TO CHEER  FOR WHOEVER,I LIKE YOUR  POEM ,MARK MARTIAN  AND JR.AND JOHNSON  I THINK ARE THE  3 I CHEER FOR.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#54 | 728 days ago

irmacourt wrote:
I DON'T SCREAM JASON READ MY PROFILE PIC I TYPE IN CAPS SO I CAN READ  THE BOOK OF NETIQUETTE SAIS
'IF YOU SUDDENLY TYPE IN CAPS LIKE TYPING IN ALL LOWER CASE LETTERS THEN TYPE A WORD OR SENTENCE OUT OF THE NORMAL LOWER CASE LETTERS SUDDENLY CAN BE CONSIDERED YELLING,'  BUT SWEETY  I CONSTANTLY TYPE IN CAPS  SO I AM NOT SCREAMING 
WHAT DID YOU SAY  HERE  IRMA  I CAN'T READ YOUR COMMENT  CAUSE OF MY EYESIGHT  IS POOR,SOME TIMES I MISS THE  A HERE  THE CAP LOCK,AND IT GOES OFF BEFORE I KNOW .THEN I  GO TO LOWER CASE BY MISTAKE.YES IT CAN BE CONCERN  YELLING  GOING FROM  THIS to thisTHIS.THAT WAS AN EXAMPLE /NOTHING MEANT  BY IT,CAN  ANYONE SAY THEY NEVER  HAD THAT HAPPEN TO THEM? 
Enter the poll to see my answer
#55 | 728 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
So you only get to read what YOU type unless we post in all caps back?  So im guessing the only word you can read out of this whole post is "you" from my previous sentence.   And im assuming that its very confusing for you to see blurryblurryblurryblurryYOUblurryblurryblurryblurry.  I apologize.   Wait..you couldnt see that...I APOLOGIZE.
JASON  BUT  I SORRY  I CAN'T READ YOUR  POST HERE,CAUSE  MY EYES ARE BAD,THAT 'S WHY I USE CAPS SO OFETN.NOT TO YELL OR SHOUT AT ANYONE HERE.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#56 | 727 days ago

JASON FOR  ME TO READ YOUR  POST IS  I HAVE TO  IT WITH MY LOOKING  GLASS OR SQUIT  OR STARE  REAL  HARD AT THAT SMALL  TYPE,YES  I READ IT YOUR  POST,BUT IT WAS  AS YOU SAY  {{ BLURRY BLURRY BLURRY ,BLURRY ]}
Enter the poll to see my answer
#57 | 727 days ago
John_Daly (+)

twilight zone
#58 | 726 days ago
cubsgirl2 (+)

indecision


I just want to give a salutation,
and remember a  coc violation.

It seems a few need to remember,
we  can only be  just one member.

I have problems keeping up with me,
God, how do you do it when you are three?

You get caught you get booted again and again,
Yet you come back and bring a friend.

So let's cheer for these talented few,
they give the mods something to do.

smiley


 

Enter the poll to see my answer
#59 | 726 days ago

cubsgirl2 wrote:

indecision


I just want to give a salutation,
and remember a  coc violation.

It seems a few need to remember,
we  can only be  just one member.

I have problems keeping up with me,
God, how do you do it when you are three?

You get caught you get booted again and again,
Yet you come back and bring a friend.

So let's cheer for these talented few,
they give the mods something to do.

smiley


 

This made me giggle.
#60 | 726 days ago

I don't have time to keep up with myself.  IDK how people have time for two or more accounts.

And....

#61 | 724 days ago

HOTDOG....you sonofab**ch!!  Where have you been, brother?   Poke around the locker room more often.  
#62 | 724 days ago
John_Daly (+)

Jason_ wrote:
HOTDOG....you sonofab**ch!!  Where have you been, brother?   Poke around the locker room more often.  
The dude is money, he writes poems like I take sh**ts. Effortless.
#63 | 724 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
The dude is money, he writes poems like I take sh**ts. Effortless.
You think he might take us on as apprentices? It might do us good to soak up some of that awesome.  
#64 | 724 days ago
John_Daly (+)

Jason_ wrote:
You think he might take us on as apprentices? It might do us good to soak up some of that awesome.  
I dont know if it can be taught.  That sh**t just seems to flow like water. All we can do is sit back, enjoy and say "I got a chance to read greatness"   
#65 | 724 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
I dont know if it can be taught.  That sh**t just seems to flow like water. All we can do is sit back, enjoy and say "I got a chance to read greatness"   
Oh man...its such a good time to be a Q'er.   I bet this is what the apostles felt like.  
#66 | 724 days ago
John_Daly (+)

Jason_ wrote:
Oh man...its such a good time to be a Q'er.   I bet this is what the apostles felt like.  
You cant pressure him either, you just gotta keep checking on here to see if he put down another masterpiece. All I can do is sit here and click refresh and hope to see Gods work in action.
#67 | 724 days ago

Rollin
#68 | 724 days ago

JenX63 wrote:
Rollin
Are they hatin?
#69 | 724 days ago

(Edited by richard_cranium)

BAM!! I think that this might have to become my go to pic for arguments on the q, like how Christi uses that hockey dude.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#70 | 724 days ago

lmao
Enter the poll to see my answer
#71 | 724 days ago

There are arguments?wink

Where? 

When?

Who? 

or 

What?
Enter the poll to see my answer
#72 | 724 days ago
John_Daly (+)

kteacher wrote:
There are arguments?wink

Where? 

When?

Who? 

or 

What?
Why?
#73 | 724 days ago

kteacher wrote:
There are arguments?wink

Where? 

When?

Who? 

or 

What?
WORST
POEM
EVER...

All youre doing is asking questions....Gah...
#74 | 724 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
Why?
How?
Enter the poll to see my answer
#75 | 724 days ago
John_Daly (+)

kteacher wrote:
How?
Exactly.   yes
#76 | 724 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
Are they hatin?
Its all good fun!
#77 | 724 days ago

(Edited by JenX63)
Jason_ wrote:
Are they hatin?
Im a dork....and Mr Richard's pic reminded me of a show yesterday where bacon was the featured ingredient.
#78 | 724 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
WORST
POEM
EVER...

All youre doing is asking questions....Gah...
enlightened
Enter the poll to see my answer
#79 | 724 days ago

JenX63 wrote:
Its all good fun!
Hmmm...i see that one went over well. 
#80 | 724 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
WORST
POEM
EVER...

All youre doing is asking questions....Gah...

Random Semi-rhyming Lines

http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/delete.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; background-position: 0px -16px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; "> http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/delete.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; display: block; width: 17px; height: 15px; background-position: 0px 0px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; " title="Cancel Rating">Cancel Rating
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http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/star.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; background-position: 0px 0px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; "> http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/star.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; display: block; width: 8px; height: 15px; background-position: 0px -16px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; " title="Give it a 3 Star Rating">3
http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/star.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; background-position: 0px 0px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; "> http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/star.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; display: block; width: 17px; height: 15px; background-position: 0px 0px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; " title="Give it a 4 Star Rating">4
http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/star.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; background-position: 0px 0px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; "> http://www.verybadpoetry.com/img/star.gif); background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: initial; display: block; width: 17px; height: 15px; background-position: 0px 0px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat; " title="Give it a 5 Star Rating">5


Violets are red
I’d like to go to bed

Roses are blue
I think you would too

Snow is white
This place is like a fight

My soul is dark
I hear my dog bark

My heart is torn
From the rose thorn

What is this poem about
I don’t know

Enter the poll to see my answer
#81 | 724 days ago

CTRL+
or
CTRL & Roll Your Mouse Forward @ The Same Time.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#82 | 724 days ago

Dream_Machine wrote:
CTRL+
or
CTRL & Roll Your Mouse Forward @ The Same Time.
Quizzical face
#83 | 724 days ago

Good Lord!!! WTF is going on here?   Leave the girl alone Jeez! She loves Q and is trying to be helpful. Is it possibe to actually be nice " FOR A CHANGE" ?... ....sad
Enter the poll to see my answer
#84 | 724 days ago

Mother f**k...that was in record time.
#85 | 724 days ago

(Edited by richard_cranium)
JenX63 wrote:
Quizzical face
Did you try it? I did, very funny Thomas!
Enter the poll to see my answer
#86 | 724 days ago

DallasFan55 wrote:
Good Lord!!! WTF is going on here?   Leave the girl alone Jeez! She loves Q and is trying to be helpful. Is it possibe to actually be nice " FOR A CHANGE" ?... ....sad
Gina...we're not even talking about that sh** anymore.  Read much?
#87 | 724 days ago

richard_cranium wrote:
Did you try it? I did, very funny Thomas!
I will now that you have!
#88 | 724 days ago

I'm Sorta Blind... So I Know It Kinda Helps.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#89 | 724 days ago

(Edited by richard_cranium)
JenX63 wrote:
I will now that you have!
It is rather pleasurable when you look at the parts of this thread that are already in all caps!
Enter the poll to see my answer
#90 | 724 days ago

Dream_Machine wrote:
CTRL+
or
CTRL & Roll Your Mouse Forward @ The Same Time.
Smart.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#91 | 724 days ago
18packabs (+)

Poetry SUCKS......devil
Enter the poll to see my answer
#92 | 723 days ago

richard_cranium wrote:
It is rather pleasurable when you look at the parts of this thread that are already in all caps!
*pleasurable* (made me giggle)
#93 | 723 days ago
John_Daly (+)

DallasFan55 wrote:
Good Lord!!! WTF is going on here?   Leave the girl alone Jeez! She loves Q and is trying to be helpful. Is it possibe to actually be nice " FOR A CHANGE" ?... ....sad
No offense to her, but I think this should be the poem for fan iq. It speaks to people, it tells a story:




I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
It annoys me and makes me think of beans.
Whats the point of doing that?
Is it to get a bunch of faniq points?, seems kinda whack.
Ohh, I dont cheer for people with 300 favorite teams.
This poem sucks but its not what it seems.
Cheer for faniq. Cheer louder than any other fan site thats out there.



                                                                                                     By, J. Daly
#94 | 723 days ago

(Edited by DeeRigga)
"ODE TO FAN IQ" by DeeRigga (Don't be trying to copyright infringe or steal my s***, Kramer!!!)


F*** a Rhyme
It takes too much time
To come up with s***
That seriously rhymes with Schmidt

But I will digress,
And I will address
That writing these lines
Will flow deep in your minds

Because, in fact
The day would be WHACK
Without the site called Fan IQ
And all the Silly A** S*** We Q-tards Do!!!!
Enter the poll to see my answer
#95 | 723 days ago

Jason_ wrote:
Gina...we're not even talking about that sh** anymore.  Read much?
Who the F is Gina?
Enter the poll to see my answer
#96 | 723 days ago

MY HEART MY HEART
GOES TO EVERY CHEER
ALL FANIQ DOING THEIR PART
WITH A CAN OF BEER
EVERY FAN A POEM DID MAKE
WEATHER OR NOT IT RHYMS
ITS EITHER  LOVE OR HATE
ALL FANS PUTTING IN THEIR TIME
SO LETS CHEER FOR ALL
WHO SAT AND MADE A CHEER
FOR THEY MUZT HAVE B@LLS
LETS GIVE THEM A BEER
CHEER
Enter the poll to see my answer
#97 | 723 days ago

(Edited by DallasFan55)
Beer beer is good for the heart.
The more ya drink the more ya fart.
The more ya fart the better you cheer.
Beer beer for every fear.
Enter the poll to see my answer
#98 | 723 days ago
John_Daly (+)

irmacourt wrote:
MY HEART MY HEART
GOES TO EVERY CHEER
ALL FANIQ DOING THEIR PART
WITH A CAN OF BEER
EVERY FAN A POEM DID MAKE
WEATHER OR NOT IT RHYMS
ITS EITHER  LOVE OR HATE
ALL FANS PUTTING IN THEIR TIME
SO LETS CHEER FOR ALL
WHO SAT AND MADE A CHEER
FOR THEY MUZT HAVE B@LLS
LETS GIVE THEM A BEER
CHEER
I dont drink.     blush
#99 | 723 days ago

sidney crosby is a girl, like a figure skater he does twirl
with his chest void of hair, he whines no matter here or there
pouting and kicking gloves away, even his owner knows he's gay
and as he exited stage right, on a warm april philly night
he's thought of in the world as number two, bowing down to Claude Giroux
#100 | 721 days ago

nah, not today
Enter the poll to see my answer
#101 | 718 days ago

John_Daly wrote:
I dont drink.     blush
HEHEHEH YOR RIGHT
WELL HEHEHEHE THEN ADD SODA OR TEA INITS PLACE BEER WAS WHAT RHYMED  FORA DRINK OL
Enter the poll to see my answer
#102 | 718 days ago

DeeRigga wrote:
"ODE TO FAN IQ" by DeeRigga (Don't be trying to copyright infringe or steal my s***, Kramer!!!)


F*** a Rhyme
It takes too much time
To come up with s***
That seriously rhymes with Schmidt

But I will digress,
And I will address
That writing these lines
Will flow deep in your minds

Because, in fact
The day would be WHACK
Without the site called Fan IQ
And all the Silly A** S*** We Q-tards Do!!!!
This ^^^^^^^^^^ should get an award!!!....... That's some serious FUNNY stuff there... Great poem! yes
Enter the poll to see my answer
#103 | 686 days ago

lol

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